CRAMP BARK

OTHER NAME(S):

Bois à Quenouille, Boule de Neige, Common Guelder-Rose, Crampbark, Cranberry Bush, European Cranberry-Bush, Guelder Rose, Guelder-Rose, High Bush Cranberry, High-bush Cranberry, Obier, Rose de Gueldre, Snowball Bush, Viburno Opulus, Viburnum opulus, Viorne Aquatique, Viorne Aubier, Viorne Obier, Viorne Trilobée.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Cramp bark is a plant that grows in North America. Historically, Native Americans used cramp bark as medicine for reducing swollen glands and treating fluid retention, mumps, and eye disorders. They also smoked cramp bark as a substitute for tobacco.

These days, the bark and root bark of this plant are still used to make medicine. As the name suggests, cramp bark is used for relieving cramps, including muscle spasms, menstrual cramps, and cramps during pregnancy. Cramp bark is also used as a kidney stimulant for urinary conditions that involve pain or spasms.

Some people use cramp bark for cancer, hysteria, infection, nervous disorders, a vitamin-deficiency condition called scurvy, and pain and swelling (inflammation) of the uterus (uteritis). Cramp bark is also used to increase urine flow and to cause vomiting, emptying of the bowels, and sleepiness.

Don’t confuse cramp bark with black haw (Vibernum prunifolium), which is sometimes referred to as cramp bark.

How does it work?

Chemicals in cramp bark seem to decrease muscle spasms. These chemicals might also lower blood pressure and decrease heart rate.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Cramps.
  • Muscle spasms.
  • Menstrual cramps.
  • Cramps during pregnancy.
  • Cancer.
  • Hysteria.
  • Nervous disorders.
  • Use as a kidney stimulant in urinary conditions which involve pain or spasms.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of cramp bark for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

There isn't enough information to know if cramp bark is safe.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of cramp bark during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for CRAMP BARK Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of cramp bark depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for cramp bark. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Nicholson, J. A., Darby, T. D., and Jarboe, C. H. Viopudial, a hypotensive and smooth muscle antispasmodic from Viburnum opulus. Proc.Soc.Exp Biol.Med. 1972;140(2):457-461. View abstract.
  • Ovodova, R. G., Golovchenko, V. V., Popov, S. V., Shashkov, A. S., and Ovodov, IuS. [The isolation, preliminary study of structure and physiological activity of water-soluble polysaccharides from squeezed berries of Snowball tree Viburnum opulus]. Bioorg.Khim. 2000;26(1):61-67. View abstract.
  • Plouvier, V. [PRESENCE OF URSOLIC ACID IN THE BLOSSOMS OF VIBURNUM OPULUS L. VAR. STERILE DC (CAPRIFOLIACEAE)]. Ann.Pharm Fr. 1964;22:313-314. View abstract.
  • Ryzhikov, M. A. and Ryzhikova, V. O. [Application of chemiluminescent methods for analysis of the antioxidant activity of herbal extracts]. Vopr.Pitan. 2006;75(2):22-26. View abstract.
  • Smetankina, P. P. [DISINFECTANT PROPERTIES OF VIBURNUM OPULUS.]. Vestn.Dermatol Venerol. 1963;37:75. View abstract.
  • Smirnova, A. S. and Iadrova, V. M. [Comparative study of the astringent effect of liquid extracts from Viburnum opulus L]. Farmatsiia. 1968;17(4):42-45. View abstract.
  • Zayachkivska, O. S., Gzhegotsky, M. R., Terletska, O. I., Lutsyk, D. A., Yaschenko, A. M., and Dzhura, O. R. Influence of Viburnum Opulus proanthocyanidins on stress-induced gastrointestinal mucosal damage. J Physiol Pharmacol 2006;57 Suppl 5:155-167. View abstract.
  • Nicholson JA, Darby TD, Jarboe CH. Viopudial, a hypotensive and smooth muscle antispasmodic from Viburnum opulus. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1972;140:457-61.

More Resources for CRAMP BARK

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.