Overview

Sida cordifolia is a plant. The seeds, leaves, and root are used to make medicine.

Sida cordifolia contains ephedrine, which is an amphetamine-like stimulant that can cause harmful side effects. Since April 2004, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has banned the sale of ephedra, Sida cordifolia, and other products that contain ephedrine.

Despite serious safety concerns, Sida cordifolia is used to treat asthma, tuberculosis, the common cold, flu, headaches, nasal congestion, cough and wheezing, urinary tract infections, sore mouth, and fluid retention (edema). It is also used for heart disease, stroke, facial paralysis, tissue pain and swelling (inflammation), sciatic nerve pain, psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, nerve pain, nerve inflammation, and achy joints (rheumatoid arthritis).

In herbal combinations, Sida cordifolia is used for weight loss, erectile dysfunction (ED), sinus problems, allergies, asthma, bronchitis, and weak bones (osteoporosis).

In combination with ginger, Sida cordifolia root is used for fever.

In combination with milk and sugar, Sida cordifolia root is used for urinary urgency (urinary incontinence) and vaginal discharges (leukorrhea).

Sida cordifolia is applied directly to the skin for numbness, nerve pain, muscle cramps, skin disorders, tumors, joint pain (osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis), healing wounds, ulcers, scorpion sting, snakebite, and as a massage oil.

How does it work ?

Sida cordifolia plant contains ephedrine, which is an amphetamine-like stimulant. It is unknown how Sida cordifolia might work for other medicinal uses.
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