Overview

Bloodroot is a plant. People use the underground stem (rhizome) to make medicine.

People sometimes use bloodroot by mouth or apply it to the skin for a long list of conditions, but there is no scientific evidence to support these uses, and using it can be unsafe.

How does it work ?

Bloodroot contains chemicals that might help fight bacteria, inflammation, and plaque.

Uses & Effectiveness ?

Possibly Effective for

  • Dental plaque. Brushing teeth with a specific toothpaste containing bloodroot and zinc chloride (Viadent Original, Vipont Pharmaceuticals) or using a similar toothpaste containing bloodroot, zinc chloride, and fluoride (Viadent Fluoride toothpaste, Vipont Pharmaceuticals) along with a using mouth rinse containing bloodroot and zinc (Viadent Oral Rinse, Vipont Pharmaceuticals) seems to reduce dental plaque. Also, rinsing with bloodroot mouthwash after a professional tooth cleaning seems to slow the regrowth of dental plaque. In addition, using a bloodroot toothpaste (Viadent toothpaste, Viadent Inc.) and rinsing with bloodroot mouthwash (Viadent Oral Rinse, Viadent Inc.) seems to prevent plaque development in teenagers wearing orthodontic devices.
  • Swelling of the gums (gingivitis). Although some conflicting results exist, most research shows that brushing with a toothpaste containing bloodroot and zinc chloride (Viadent Original, Vipont Pharmaceuticals) or using a similar toothpaste containing bloodroot, zinc chloride, and fluoride (Viadent Fluoride toothpaste, Vipont Pharmaceuticals) along with a mouth rinse containing bloodroot and zinc (Viadent Oral Rinse, Vipont Pharmaceuticals) reduces gingivitis. Also, rinsing with bloodroot mouthwash (Viadent Oral Rinse) after a professional tooth cleaning seems to slow the development of gingivitis.

Insufficient Evidence for

  • A serious dental infection (periodontitis). Early research shows that using toothpaste and a mouth rinse containing bloodroot extract and zinc chloride for 2 weeks following usual periodontitis treatment reduces gum swelling and bleeding, but not dental plaque, in people with periodontitis.
  • Coughs.
  • Spasms.
  • Emptying the bowels.
  • Causing vomiting.
  • Wound cleaning.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of bloodroot for these uses.

Side Effects

Bloodroot is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth, short-term. Side effects include nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, and grogginess.

Long-term use by mouth in high amounts is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. At high doses it can cause low blood pressure, shock, coma, and an eye disease called glaucoma. Also, bloodroot is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used as a toothpaste, mouthwash, or applied to the skin. Don't let bloodroot get into your eyes because it can cause irritation. It may also cause white patches on the inside of the mouth. Skin contact with the fresh plant can cause a rash. Bloodroot can also burn and erode the skin, leaving an uneven scar.

Special Precautions and Warnings

Bloodroot is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth, short-term. Side effects include nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, and grogginess.

Long-term use by mouth in high amounts is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. At high doses it can cause low blood pressure, shock, coma, and an eye disease called glaucoma. Also, bloodroot is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used as a toothpaste, mouthwash, or applied to the skin. Don't let bloodroot get into your eyes because it can cause irritation. It may also cause white patches on the inside of the mouth. Skin contact with the fresh plant can cause a rash. Bloodroot can also burn and erode the skin, leaving an uneven scar. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Bloodroot is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth during pregnancy and POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth while breast-feeding; avoid use.

Stomach or intestinal problems such as infections, Crohn's disease, or other inflammatory conditions: Bloodroot can irritate the digestive tract. Don't use it if you have any of these conditions.

An eye disease called glaucoma: Bloodroot might affect glaucoma treatment. If you have glaucoma, don't use bloodroot unless a healthcare professional recommends it and monitors your eye health.

Interactions ?

We currently have no information for BLOODROOT overview.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of bloodroot depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for bloodroot. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2020.