Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Domestic Violence: Getting a Protective Order

Font Size

Topic Overview

How to get a protective order:

  • Call your local advocacy group or your local district or state attorney's office, or tell the police you want to get one. You may be able to get an emergency protective order immediately.
  • For a temporary protective order, you will probably have to see a family court judge. Tell the judge about times you have been threatened with violence or have suffered abuse. List any witnesses, including police officers, who may help your case.
  • Show the judge any evidence of physical abuse, such as photos of bruises, injuries, or damaged property.
  • Tell the judge about any prior arrests the abuser has had, or obtain the arrest reports. You may be able to get these from the police department or sheriff's office in the community where past abuse occurred.

To be eligible for a protective order, you and the other party must fit into at least one of the following categories:

  • Married, or formerly married
  • Related by blood, marriage, or adoption
  • Currently living together or must have formerly lived together
  • Currently or formerly in a dating relationship
  • The parents in common of minor children

For a protective order to work effectively, you must:

  • Inform the court of your specific safety needs, including when you are at work, those of your children, and any other particular circumstances.
  • Request custody and visitation restrictions or "no contact" orders to ensure your children's safety.
  • Call the police every time the order is violated.

If you travel to another state, check to see whether your protective order is valid in that state. Protective orders are valid across some state lines. Protective orders remain in effect until they are removed by the court, even if the victim consents to contact with the abuser.

Your local domestic violence program or a qualified attorney can help you get a protective order. To find the nearest program offering legal support, see the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence's website at www.ncadv.org/resources/StateCoalitionList.php. The National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (1-800-799-7233) can also provide you with contacts.

1

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: March 08, 2012
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
Next Article:

Domestic Violence: Getting a Protective Order Topics

Hot Topics

WebMD Video: Now Playing

Click here to wach video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

Which sex is the worst about washing up? Why is it so important? We’ve got the dirty truth on how and when to wash your hands.

Click here to watch video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

Popular Slideshows & Tools on WebMD

hands on abdomen
Can you catch one?
Woman sitting in front of UV lights
Is yours working?
woman using breath spray
What's causing yours?
womans hand on abdomen
Are you ready for baby?
MS Overview
Recognizing symptoms.
bowl of yogurt with heart shape
Eat for a healthy heart.
woman doing pushups
To help you get fit.
Colored x-ray of tooth decay
Know what to look for.
Woman sitting with child
Do you know the symptoms?
mosquito
Stings, bites, burns, and more.
Allentown, PA
Are you living in one?
Thyroid exam
See how much you know.

Women's Health Newsletter

Find out what women really need.