Skip to content

Anxiety & Panic Disorders Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Beyond 'White Coat Syndrome'

Fear of doctors and tests can hinder preventive health care.
By
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

When Dorothea Lack was a little girl, she hid under a doctor's desk to avoid a vaccination. Undaunted, the doctor crawled under the desk and vaccinated her then and there. Lack said the incident provoked a fear of doctors that followed her into adulthood. "I didn't feel I could trust them," says Lack, PhD, now a psychologist who performs research on doctor-patient relations.

It's a rare soul who truly enjoys visiting the doctor. But for a significant minority of the population, fear and anxiety prevents them from getting vital care. The problem has grown in importance with medicine's increasing emphasis on preventive care. Screenings such as mammograms, colorectal exams, cholesterol checks, and digital rectal exams can save lives, but only if people are willing to submit to uncomfortable procedures well before symptoms have emerged.

Recommended Related to Anxiety Panic

Understanding Generalized Anxiety Disorder -- Diagnosis and Treatment

The first step is to rule out the possibility that your symptoms are being caused by a medical condition that is not psychiatric. Among the conditions that produce symptoms similar to those of anxiety are hyperthyroidism or other endocrine problems, too much or too little calcium, low blood sugar, and certain heart problems. Certain medicines also can sometimes cause anxiety. A thorough evaluation by your health care provider will determine if any of these conditions are the cause of your symptoms...

Read the Understanding Generalized Anxiety Disorder -- Diagnosis and Treatment article > >

Fortunately, there are proven methods for relieving fear of doctors. But dealing with the problem first requires fessing up to it. Many people may hide their fear by saying they don't have time for a doctor's visit, says Jennifer Hay, PhD, a health psychology researcher at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. "The first step to putting [fear] in its place is acknowledging that it's there," says Hay, who also counsels cancer patients. "Some of the most powerful fears are the ones we don't acknowledge."

Fear of a White Coat

Even if setting foot into a doctor's office doesn't feel like walking into a lion's den, your body may be priming for a threat. As much as 20 percent of the population suffers from "white coat syndrome," in which blood pressure surges when measured in the doctor's office. The syndrome produces a challenge for physicians seeking an accurate blood pressure reading. But a fear response in a health care setting is perfectly normal because most people associate hospitals and clinics with sickness and injury, says Nathan Consedine, PhD, a health psychology researcher at Long Island University.

"Fear is a response selected in evolution to promote immediate avoidance of a very salient physical threat," Consedine says. "Doctor's offices and hospitals are places where bad things happen, so it's not surprising that people avoid them." A person with white coat syndrome may not feel anxious even as her body, "at a low level, is ready to run away."

1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Today on WebMD

young leukemia patient
Article
Unhappy couple
Article
 
embarrassed woman
SLIDESHOW
clown
Quiz
 
Phobias frightened eyes
Slideshow
podium
Article
 
organize
Article
stressed boy in classroom
Article
 
Distressed teen girl in dramatic lighting
Article
man hiding with phone
Article
 
chain watch
Article
tarantula
Article