Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Depression Health Center

Font Size

Light Therapy - Topic Overview

What is light therapy?

Light therapy (phototherapy) is exposure to light that is brighter than indoor light but not as bright as direct sunlight. Do not use ultraviolet light, full-spectrum light, heat lamps, or tanning lamps for light therapy.

Light therapy may help with depression, jet lag, and sleep disorders. It may help reset your "biological clock" (circadian rhythms), which controls sleeping and waking.

Recommended Related to Depression

Coping With Side Effects of Depression Treatment

If you are being treated for moderate to severe depression, a doctor or psychiatrist has probably prescribed an antidepressant medication for you.  When they work properly, they help to relieve symptoms and, along with other approaches such as talk therapy, are an important part of treatment. One way antidepressants work is by altering the balance of certain chemicals in your brain. And, as with all medicines, this change can cause side effects. Some, like jitteriness, weird dreams, dry mouth, and...

Read the Coping With Side Effects of Depression Treatment article > >

What is light therapy used for?

People use light therapy to treat seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which is depression related to shorter days and reduced sunlight exposure during the fall and winter months. Most people with SAD feel better after they use light therapy. This may be because light therapy replaces the lost sunlight exposure and resets the body's internal clock.

When should light therapy be used?

Light therapy may be most effective when you use it first thing in the morning when you wake up. You and your doctor or therapist can determine when light therapy works best for you. Response to this therapy usually occurs in 2 to 4 days, but it may take up to 3 weeks of light therapy before symptoms of SAD (such as depression) are relieved.

It's not clear how well light therapy works at other times of the day. But some people with SAD (perhaps those who wake up early in the morning) may find it helpful to use light therapy for 1 to 2 hours in the evening, stopping at least 1 hour before bedtime.

Is light therapy safe?

Light therapy generally is safe, and you may use it together with other treatments. If symptoms of depression do not improve, or if they become worse, it is important to follow up with your doctor or therapist.

The most common side effects of light therapy include:

You can relieve these side effects by decreasing the amount of time you spend under the light.

People who have sensitive eyes or skin should not use light therapy without first consulting a doctor.

Always tell your doctor if you are using an alternative therapy or if you are thinking about combining an alternative therapy with your conventional medical treatment. It may not be safe to forgo your conventional medical treatment and rely only on an alternative therapy.

1

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: June 11, 2013
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
Next Article:

Today on WebMD

contemplation
Differences between feeling depressed or blue.
depressed man
How well are you managing your symptoms?
 
depressed man sitting on hallway floor
Learn the truth about this serious illness.
Sad woman looking out of the window
Tips to stay the treatment course.
 
Woman taking pill
Article
Woman jogging outside
Feature
 
man screaming
Article
woman standing behind curtains
Article
 
Pet scan depression
Slideshow
antidepressants slideshow
Article
 
pill bottle
Article
Winding path
Article