Skip to content

Diabetes Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Black Men and Diabetes: Preventing It, Managing It

African Americans have a 50% chance of developing diabetes, but most black men pay little heed to the warnings -- and pay the price. Fortunately, type 2 diabetes is both preventable and manageable.

WebMD Feature

Brian (not his real name) had always been athletic in junior high and high school, but when he started to put on some weight in his mid-20s, he didn't worry too much about it. He didn't have time. Later, as a single man and small-business owner in his early 40s, Brian ate most of his meals in junk food at his desk and rarely exercised. He'd been diagnosed with high blood pressure and high cholesterol about five years earlier, but he paid little attention when his brother, a doctor, warned him that his weight and his family history of diabetes put him in a high-risk category.

Then he walked into his doctor's office weighing 330 pounds -- even at his 6'4" height, 100 pounds more than his ideal weight. When the doctor measured his blood sugar, it registered at a whopping 550 milligrams per deciliter, or about five times higher than normal. "You just don't see that kind of blood sugar," marvels Lenore Coleman, PharmD, CDE, founder of Black and Brown Sugar, a diabetes information web site for minority populations, and author of the forthcoming Healing Our Village: A Self-Care Guide to Diabetes Control.

Recommended Related to Diabetes

Diabetes 9 to 5: Tips to Help You Manage Your Diabetes at Work

When television's perennially popular Mary Richards walked into WJM's Minneapolis newsroom in 1970, she did more than show the world a single girl could "make it on her own." The award-winning actress who portrayed her -- Mary Tyler Moore -- also showed us diabetes and a career could coexist. Moore was diagnosed with adult-onset type 1 diabetes in the 1960s, several years before her Emmy-winning show began. But that didn't stop Moore from pursuing her career or turning the world on with a smile...

Read the Diabetes 9 to 5: Tips to Help You Manage Your Diabetes at Work article > >

Brian, like millions of other black men, has type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is the fifth deadliest disease in the U.S., and it's hitting black communities especially hard. If current trends continue, black men will be facing an epidemic of diabetes by the year 2050.

  • Approximately 2.7 million or 11.4% of all African Americans aged 20 years or older have diabetes -- but at least one-third of them don't know it.
  • The average African American born today has a 50% chance of developing type 2 diabetes in his or her lifetime.

Why does diabetes hit African-American men so hard, and what can they do about it? "First, there's the obesity issue. Caucasians tend to have a different body image than African Americans; we don't feel like we're overweight when we're 30-60 pounds above our ideal weight," says Coleman, who is black.

"My patient thought he had a little too much around the middle, but he never considered himself morbidly obese, which he was. And like many black men, he lived alone and managed his own meals, which is a huge issue," she says. "If you're married, you tend to plan your meals more and eat a little better. African Americans also tend to eat a lot of fried foods, foods that are very high in carbohydrates, lots of sweets and sugars and starches." In fact, some studies have shown that African-American men eat fewer fruits and vegetables than any other demographic group.

1 | 2 | 3

Today on WebMD

Diabetic tools
Symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and more.
woman flexing muscles
10 strength training exercises.
 
Blood sugar test
12 practical tips.
Tom Hanks
Stars living with type 1 or type 2.
 
kenneth fujioka, md
Video
Can Vinegar Treat Diabetes
Article
 
Middle aged person
Tool
Home Healthcare
Video
 

Prediabetes How to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Article
type 2 diabetes
Slideshow
 
food fitness planner
Tool
feet
Slideshow