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A workout injury can happen to anyone, no matter your experience or fitness level. Even walking can cause an injury.

But you can significantly cut your risk of getting hurt by following certain workout precautions.

Common Workout Injuries

People hurt themselves in all kinds of ways when they work out. Common workout injuries include:

Preventing Workout Injuries

There are simple steps that can help keep you injury-free during your workout.

But first, pay attention to this general rule. If you're a woman over age 55, check with your health care professional before you start an exercise program. Then you'll be sure you're healthy enough for working out. The same applies to a man over age 45 or a person with any medical condition.

Here are guidelines for avoiding injuries during your workout:

Warm-up and cool-down. Every workout should begin with a warm-up and end with a cool-down period. A warm-up helps your body get ready for exercise. It gradually increases your heart rate and loosens your muscles and joints. Some ways to warm up:

  • ride an exercise bike
  • jump rope
  • jog in place for 5 to 10 minutes

A cool-down after you work out is important to slowly bring your heart rate back to normal. Walking for 5 to 10 minutes after you work out is one way to cool down.

Stretch. Do dynamic stretching before and after you work out. This will help increase flexibility. Research is conflicting as to whether it can also help prevent injury, It's best to stretch after you warm up and cool down.

Ease into it. When you begin an exercise routine or start a new workout program, start slowly. Then gradually build up the intensity, duration, and frequency.

Don't push yourself too hard. As your fitness abilities increase, you will be able to challenge yourself more.

Cross-train. Vary your workout. Don't overuse one set of muscles. Repeating the same muscle movements frequently can lead to overuse and repetitive-use injuries such as shin splints and tendinitis. Some ways to vary your workout:

  • Run on Day One.
  • Lift weights on Day Two.
  • Swim or cycle on Day Three.

Heart Rate Calculator

Ensure you're exercising hard enough to get a good workout, but not strain your heart.

While you are exercising, you should count between...

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Beats
PER
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Heart Rate Calculator

Ensure you're exercising hard enough to get a good workout, but not strain your heart.

While you are exercising, you should count between...

-
Beats
PER
Seconds