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Heart Disease Health Center

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Proper Nutrition and Heart Health

WebMD's top 5 vitamins and minerals for heart health. Part 2 of a three-part series.
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Making More Magnesium Mandatory

Large studies have linked magnesium deficiency to high blood pressure, while some have shown an association between magnesium supplements and a decreased risk of death from heart disease.

"Some researchers say that, as a nation, we could cut our rate of heart disease by one-half if we took more magnesium," says City Island, N.Y.-based Carolyn Dean, MD, ND, author of The Miracle of Magnesium. "Magnesium is the body's natural calcium channel blocker. It balances out the excess calcium that is associated with the heart going into muscle spasm, which equals a heart attack."

Dark, leafy green vegetables are rich in magnesium, and whole grains and nuts also are good sources.

"Cooked and processed foods also lose a lot of magnesium, making it a very deficient mineral." That's why Dean suggests taking 300 mg two to three times a day of magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, or magnesium glycinate. Magnesium supplements can interfere with the absorption of certain medications and may cause diarrhea, so be sure to talk to your doctor first.

Data from the Nurses' Health Study and the Harvard School of Public Health back up Dean's claims. A higher intake of magnesium may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Research has shown that low levels of magnesium may impair insulin sensitivity or function. Consuming adequate levels of magnesium may help insulin function properly in the body, which may prevent type 2 diabetes.

The American Heart Association (AHA) lists diabetes as one of the six major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. In fact, adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease or a stroke than adults without diabetes.

Not Fooling With Folic Acid

Folic acid, a B vitamin, is important for heart health, experts agree. The amount of homocysteine in the blood, a marker for heart disease, is regulated by folic acid.

"High levels of homocysteine can lead to heart disease, and the way to combat high homocysteine is to take folic acid," says Michael Poon, MD, chief of cardiology at Cabrini Medical Center in New York. Aim for 1 milligram or 1,000 micrograms a day, he says.

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