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Heart Disease and Exercise

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Exercise may be one of the best moves you can make, even if you have heart disease.

Consider just a few of the possible benefits of exercise:

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Your cardiologist or regular doctor may have already talked with you about setting up an exercise routine and let you know what's safe for you to do. If not, ask them:

  • How much exercise can I do each day?
  • How often can I exercise each week?
  • What types of activities should I try, and what should I avoid?
  • Should I take my medication(s) at a certain time around my exercise schedule?
  • Should I take my pulse while exercising? What should it be?
  • What warning signs should I watch out for while exercising?

Types of Exercise

Your workout plan will generally include these two main kinds:

  1. Cardiovascular or aerobic exercise. This is the type that benefits your heart most. Examples include walking, jogging, jumping rope, bicycling, skiing, skating, rowing, and aerobics or cardio classes. These strengthen your heart and lungs. Over time, aerobic exercise can help your blood pressure and improve your breathing, and then your heart won't have to work as hard during exercise.
  2. Strength training. These exercises tone and build up your muscles. You may use hand weights, weight machines at a gym, or your own body weight. Typically, you do several sets of each exercise, and then let those muscles rest a day or two between sessions.

Stretching also helps. Do this gently, after you're done with your workout. Never stretch so far that it hurts, and don't stretch until you've warmed up.

You may want to work with a certified personal trainer, ideally one who has helped people who have heart disease, at least at first.

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