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Facebook Making Women Feel Bad About Their Bodies?

Study found more time on the social networking site was tied to greater likelihood of negative self-image

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Brenda Goodman

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, April 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Too much time on Facebook may take a toll on a young woman's sense of self-esteem, particularly how she feels about her body, a new study suggests.

The study surveyed 881 female college students. They were asked questions about their Facebook use within the past month, including how often they visited the site, how long they typically spent there and what their favorite activities were.

One question, for example, asked the women, "When looking at someone else's photos on Facebook, how much attention do you pay to: 1) how they dress, and 2) their body?"

The women were also asked about their eating habits and body image, as well as their current weight, ideal weight and class rank.

The average weight of women in the study was 149 pounds, but most wanted to weigh about 20 pounds less than that. On average, they pegged their ideal weight at around 130 pounds.

Most spent about 80 minutes on Facebook every day. The most popular activities were reading the news feed and looking at photos, according to the study.

Spending more time on Facebook was linked to a significantly greater likelihood that a woman would feel bad about her own body, the study revealed. It also was tied to greater odds that she would compare herself to others.

That was especially true if she felt like she needed to lose weight, the researchers noted.

However, women who wanted to gain or maintain their weight did not feel bad about themselves after logging on to the social networking site.

While the study found an association between Facebook use and poor body image, it was not designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

The research was to be presented Thursday at the International Communication Association annual conference, in Seattle. Research presented at meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

"Women tend to present their ideal self on Facebook, not necessarily their actual, true self," said study author Petya Eckler, who is lecturer in journalism at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland.

Eckler said many people Photoshop their pictures before posting or they use an app like SkinneePix, which claims to shave pounds off a selfie.

Women who compare themselves to these idealized photos may come away feeling inferior, Eckler noted, adding that she worries that it could set vulnerable young women up for an eating disorder.

"Feeling negatively about yourself and increased body comparison is sort of the first step towards disordered eating. Not in everyone, but that's definitely one of the phases women go through," she said.

This study didn't find a link between full-blown eating disorders and Facebook use, but previous studies have identified some worrisome trends.

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