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Health & Baby

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Postpartum: First 6 Weeks After Childbirth - Recovery At Home

During the days and weeks after the delivery of your baby (postpartum period), your body will change as it returns to its nonpregnant condition. As with pregnancy changes, postpartum changes are different for every woman.

Physical changes after childbirth

The changes in your body may include sore muscles and bleeding.

  • Contractions called afterpains shrink the uterus for several days after childbirth. Shrinking of the uterus to its prepregnancy size may take 6 to 8 weeks.
  • Sore muscles (especially in the arms, neck, or jaw) are common after childbirth. This is because of the hard work of labor. The soreness should go away in a few days.
  • Bleeding and vaginal discharge (lochia) may last for 2 to 4 weeks and can come and go for about 2 months.
  • Vaginal soreness, including pain, discomfort, and numbness, is common after vaginal birth. Soreness may be worse if you had a perineal tear or episiotomy.
  • If you had a cesarean (C-section), you may have pain in your lower belly and may need pain medicine for 1 to 2 weeks.
  • Breast engorgementBreast engorgement is common between the third and fourth days after delivery, when the breasts begin to fill with milk. This can cause discomfort and swelling. Placing ice packs on your breasts, taking a hot shower, or using warm compresses may relieve the discomfort. For more information, see the topic Breast Engorgement.

Call your doctor if you are concerned about any of your symptoms. For more information, see When to Call a Doctor.

Care after vaginal birth

Most women need some time after delivery to return to their normal activities. It's important to focus on your healing and on taking care of your body after delivery.

  • Use pads instead of tampons for the bloody flow that may last as long as 2 weeks.
  • Ease cramps or afterpains with ibuprofen (such as Advil). If the doctor gave you a prescription medicine for pain, take it as prescribed.
  • If you have swelling or pain around the opening of your vagina, try using ice. You can put ice or a cold pack on the area for 10 to 20 minutes at a time. Put a thin cloth between the ice and your skin.
  • Cleanse yourself with a gentle squeeze of warm water from a bottle instead of wiping with toilet paper.
  • Try sitting in a few inches of warm water (sitz bath) 3 times a day and after bowel movements.
  • Ease the soreness of hemorrhoids and the area between your vagina and rectum with ice compresses or witch hazel pads.
  • Ease constipation by drinking lots of fluid and eating high-fiber foods. Ask your doctor about over-the-counter stool softeners.
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