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What does insulin do?

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  • Insulin is a hormone that helps move sugar, or glucose, into your body's tissues. Cells use it as fuel. Damage to beta cells from type 1 diabetes throws the process off. Glucose doesn’t move into your cells because insulin isn’t there to do it. Instead it builds up in your blood and your cells starve. This causes high blood sugar, which can lead to: Dehydration. When there’s extra sugar in your blood, you urinate more. That’s your body’s way of getting rid of it. A large amount of water goes out with that urine, causing your body to dry out.
  • Weight loss. The glucose that goes out when you urinate takes calories with it. That’s why many people with high blood sugar lose weight. Dehydration also plays a part.
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis. If your body can't get enough glucose for fuel, it breaks down fat cells instead. This creates chemicals called ketones. Your liver releases the sugar it stores to help out. But your body can’t use it without insulin, so it builds up in your blood, along with the acidic ketones. This combination of extra glucose, dehydration, and acid buildup is known as "ketoacidosis" and can be life-threatening if not treated right away.
  • Damage to your body. Over time, high glucose levels in your blood can harm the nerves and small blood vessels in your eyes, kidneys, and heart. They can also make you more likely to get hardening of the arteries, or atherosclerosis, which can lead to heart attacks and strokes.

From: Type 1 Diabetes WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association. , January 2004. Diabetes Care

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation: "Fact Sheets: Type 1 Diabetes Facts."

American Diabetes Association: "Diabetes Basics: Type 1;" “Exercise and Type 1 Diabetes;" “Insulin Routines;” “Insulin Basics;” and “Insulin Pumps.”

Joslin Diabetes Center: “The Truth About the So-Called Diabetes Diet.”

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 28, 2018

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association. , January 2004. Diabetes Care

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation: "Fact Sheets: Type 1 Diabetes Facts."

American Diabetes Association: "Diabetes Basics: Type 1;" “Exercise and Type 1 Diabetes;" “Insulin Routines;” “Insulin Basics;” and “Insulin Pumps.”

Joslin Diabetes Center: “The Truth About the So-Called Diabetes Diet.”

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 28, 2018

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What do you need to do daily to lower your blood sugar if you have diabetes?

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