Health Benefits of Sole Water

Sole water — pronounced “so-lay” water — is also known as pink Himalayan salt water. It’s a simple mixture of Himalayan salt and water, which takes on a pink-tinged hue from the color of the salt. It’s pretty and popular, but there isn’t much conclusive evidence in favor of its possible health benefits.

Himalayan salt may be the most well-known unrefined salt widely available. Unlike typical bright white refined salts, which have been bleached and have had most of their minerals removed, with extra iodine added in, unrefined salts like Himalayan salt retain more of their healthy minerals like magnesium and potassium, without any additives.

Some popular claims suggest that sole water helps with a variety of conditions and healthy habits, including weight loss and improved sleep patterns. However, more research is necessary to fully understand its potential health benefits. 

Health Benefits

Salt and sodium are an important part of your body, but it isn’t hard to get enough of it. In fact, 9 out of 10 Americans consume too much salt. Many of the potential health benefits from sole water come from staying well hydrated and maintaining a good sodium balance in your diet. Drinking sole water might help you do both at once, if you keep a careful eye on your daily intake.

Depending on the type of salt used in your salt water, you may also be drinking some extra healthy minerals, but the minerals found in pink Himalayan salt are only present in trace amounts, which may not be enough to see any real health benefits.

Studies suggest sole water might help with the following:

Better Sleep

A healthy salt intake may improve your sleep patterns. One study found that a low-sodium diet contributed to disturbed sleep, which suggests that a higher level of salt intake could improve sleep patterns in general.

Hydration 

Sole water consists mostly of water, which has its own benefits. Drinking water regularly throughout the day increases hydration and can help with physical performance and energy levels. Studies have shown that good hydration can ease symptoms of headaches and reduce their frequency, too.

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And sodium-rich water, like sole water, may have extra benefits. A recent study of runners participating outdoors in a 10-kilometer race found that they stayed better hydrated throughout the event if they drank water that included extra sodium, compared to those who pre-hydrated with plain water.

Stress Reduction

Drinking sole water increases sodium, which can lead to lower stress levels. One study showed that elevated sodium levels in the body can inhibit stress hormones in stressful situations.

Weight Loss

Salt water has no calories, so drinking it won’t affect your daily energy intake. This is good news if you’re looking to add more salt to your diet without extra calories or fat. Sole water is a treat you can integrate into your routine when you’re looking to stay hydrated and add some flavor while trying to lose weight.

Nutrition

Sole water is a simple combination of plain water and Himalayan salt, so it doesn’t have much in it besides salt. If you’re looking for the minerals rumored to be in Himalayan salt or sole water, you’d have better luck looking for a confirmed source of magnesium or calcium, though sole water does contain quite a bit of sodium.

Nutrients per Serving

A 1.5 gram ( 1/4 teaspoon) serving of pink Himalayan salt contains:

Portion sizes

A 1.5 gram serving of sole water contains about 18% of the daily recommended sodium value. 

While this is a small amount, pink Himalayan salt water can still help you boost your nutrient levels if you drink it regularly.

Things to Watch Out For

Although sodium is a necessary mineral to keep your body healthy, and drinking salted water like sole water is a great way to stay hydrated, it’s important to keep an eye on your daily salt intake. While salt may be calorie-free and fat-free, excess sodium can cause you to retain water and gain weight, and it can put you at risk of increased blood pressure, stroke, kidney diseases, and more.

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How to Prepare Sole Water

Making sole water at home is simple. You’ll need pink Himalayan salt, water, and a glass jar or other clear container. Here are  three easy steps to making sole water:

1. Create the Solution

Fill the jar ¼ of the way full with Himalayan salt and fill the rest of the jar with water. The precise amounts depend on the size of jar or container you use.

2. Shake and Let It Sit

Seal the jar, shake it, and let the water sit overnight. The mixture is ready when all the salt has dissolved in the water. Sometimes this can take 24 hours. 

3. Mix the Solution with Water to Consume

Then, when you’re ready to drink your sole water, you’ll need to mix the concentrated solution you made with more fresh water to dilute it. Take about a teaspoon of your solution and mix it up in a glass of water. Your sole water is now ready to drink.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on November 17, 2020

Sources

Sources: 

American Heart Association: “Effects of Excess Sodium.”

BioMed Central public health: “Public knowledge of dehydration and fluid intake practices: variation by participants’ characteristics.”

FoodData Central: “Pink Himalayan Salt.”

Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism: “Sodium-restricted diet increases nighttime plasma norepinephrine and impairs sleep patterns in man.”

Journal of Human Sport and Exercise: “Is sodium a good hyperhydration strategy in 10k runners?”

Journal of Neuroscience: “Hydration State Controls Stress Responsiveness and Social Behavior.”

Louix Dor Dempriey Foundation: “The difference Between Refined Salt and Unrefined Salt.”

ParkView Wellness: “Sole Water Detox.”

Revue Roumaine de Chimie: “Morphological and microchemical characterization of Himalayan salt samples.”

Science-Based Medicine: “Pass the Salt (But Not that Pink Himalayan Stuff).”

© 2020 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

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