Smoking Cessation Benefits

From the WebMD Archives

Q: How long after I quit smoking will I begin to see the benefits?

A: Almost immediately. Here’s a quick rundown from the Cleveland Clinic:

After 20 minutes: Your blood pressure and pulse decrease. The temperature of your hands and feet increases.

After eight hours: The carbon monoxide level in your blood returns to normal. Oxygen levels in your blood increase.

After 24 hours: Your chance of heart attack decreases.

After 48 hours: Your ability to taste and smell starts to return.

After 72 hours: The bronchial tubes (airways) relax.

After two weeks to three months: Your circulation improves.

After one to nine months: Cilia (tiny hairs) in the lungs regrow, increasing the lung's capacity to handle mucus, clean itself, and reduce infection. Coughing, sinus congestion, fatigue, and shortness of breath also decrease.

After one to five years: Your risk of dying from heart disease is cut to half that of a lifelong smoker's risk.

After 10 years: Your risk of dying from lung cancer drops to almost the same rate as that of a lifelong nonsmoker. Your risk for mouth, larynx, and other cancers decreases.

Brad Bowman, MD, WebMD Medical Editor

WebMD Magazine - Feature Reviewed by Michael W. Smith, MD on January 01, 2008
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