HYPERIMMUNE EGG

OTHER NAME(S):

Egcel, Egg Albumen, Egg Extract, Egg Powder with Immune Components, Extrait d'Œuf, Gamma-livetin, HEY, Huevo Hiperinmune, Hyperimmune Hen Egg, Hyperimmunized Egg Yolk, IgY, Immune Egg, Immunoglobulin Egg Extract, Immunoglobulin Y, Œuf Hyperimmunisé, Yolk Immunoglobulin.

Overview

Overview Information

Hyperimmune egg is an egg from a hen that has been vaccinated against certain infectious diseases. The hen makes antibodies against these diseases. These antibodies pass into the hen's eggs. People remove the antibodies from the egg yolks and use them as medicine.

Hyperimmune egg is used for cystic fibrosis, a digestive tract infection that can lead to ulcers (Helicobacter pylori or H. pylori), diarrhea caused by rotavirus, and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

How does it work?

Antibodies contained in hyperimmune egg are thought to stimulate the immune system and help the body fight disease.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Cystic fibrosis. Early research shows that taking hyperimmune egg from hens vaccinated with a specific bacteria called Pseudomonas aeruginosa reduces the number of times this bacteria is found in the saliva.
  • A digestive tract infection that can lead to ulcers (Helicobacter pylori or H. pylori). Early research shows that taking hyperimmune egg from hens vaccinated with H. pylori reduces how much of this bacteria is found in the stomach. This might reduce the risk of ulcers.
  • High cholesterol. Early research shows that taking a specific hyperimmune egg product (Immune26, Legacy for Life) for 26 weeks does not lower cholesterol.
  • Osteoarthritis. One research study found that some people with osteoarthritis feel less joint pain or swelling after taking a specific hyperimmune egg product (Immune26, Legacy for Life) for 2 months. But some researchers believe this study was not well designed and the results might be questionable.
  • A serious gum infection (periodontitis). Early research shows that taking hyperimmune egg from hens vaccinated with bacteria found in the mouth reduces some symptoms of gum infections.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). One research study found that taking a specific hyperimmune egg product (Immune26, Legacy for Life) for 2 months does not improve RA symptoms.
  • Diarrhea caused by rotavirus. Early research shows that taking hyperimmune egg from hens vaccinated with rotavirus can decrease diarrhea caused by rotavirus by a small amount in children aged 2-24 months.
  • Athletic performance.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of hyperimmune egg for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

When taken by mouth: Hyperimmune egg is POSSIBLY SAFE for adults when used appropriately for up to 26 weeks. Some people may experience diarrhea, gas, and bloating.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if hyperimmune egg is safe to use when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Children: Hyperimmune egg is POSSIBLY SAFE when used in children aged 2-24 months for up to 4 days.

Egg allergy: Hyperimmune egg is made from chicken eggs. There is some concern that people who are allergic to chicken eggs might also be allergic to hyperimmune egg products.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for HYPERIMMUNE EGG Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of hyperimmune egg depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for hyperimmune egg. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Bogstedt AK, Hammarstrom L, Robertson AK. Survival of immunoglobulins from different species through the gastrointestinal tract in healthy adult volunteers: implications for human therapy (letter). Antimicrob Ag Chemother 1997;41(10):2320. View abstract.
  • Dean KL. Hyperimmune eggs capture natural immune support. Altern Complement Ther 2000;6:118-24.
  • Greenblatt HC, Adalsteinsson O, Kagen L. Administration to arthritis patients of a dietary supplement containing immune egg: An open-label pilot study. J Med Food 1998;1:171-9.
  • Hong KS, Ki MR, Ullah HMA, et al. Preventive effect of anti-VacA egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY) on Helicobacter pylori-infected mice. Vaccine 2018;36(3):371-80. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.11.082. View abstract.
  • Horie K, Horie N, Abdou AM, et al. Suppressive effect of functional drinking yogurt containing specific egg yolk immunoglobulin on Helicobacter pylori in humans. J Dairy Sci 2004;87(12):4073-9. View abstract.
  • Jacoby HI, Moore G, Wnorowski G. Inhibition of diarrhea by immune egg: a castor oil mouse model. J Nutra Funct Med Foods 2001;3:47-53.
  • Karge WH, Deluca JP, Marchitelli LJ, et al. Pilot study on the effect of hyperimmune egg protein on elevated cholesterol levels and cardiovascular risk factors. J Med Food 1999;2:51-63.
  • Kollberg H, Carlander D, Olesen H, Wejaker PE, Johannesson M, Larsson A. Oral administration of specific yolk antibodies (IgY) may prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis: a phase 1 feasibility study. Pediatr Pulmonol 2003;35(6):433-40. View abstract.
  • Nguyen SV, Nguyen MTH, Tran BC, Ho MTQ, Umeda K, Rahman S. Evaluation of lozenges containing egg yolk antibody against Porphyromonas gingivalis gingipains as an adjunct to conventional non-surgical therapy in periodontitis patients: A randomized controlled clinical trial. J Periodontol 2018;89(11):1334-9. doi: 10.1002/JPER.18-0037. View abstract.
  • Nilsson E, Larsson A, Olesen HV, Wejaker PE, Kollberg H. Good effect of IgY against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Pediatr Pulmonol 2008;43(9):892-9. View abstract.
  • Sarker SA, Casswall TH, Juneja LR, et al. Randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of hyperimmunized chicken egg yolk immunoglobulin in children with rotavirus diarrhea. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2001;32:19-25. View abstract.
  • Scheett TM, Martin TD, Carr BM, et al. Hyperimmune Egg Protein Decreases Submaximal Heart Rate and Increases Peak Power (poster). Medicine & Science in Sports Medicine & Exercise 2007;39(5):S365. https://insights.ovid.com/medicine-science-sports-exercise/mespex/2007/05/001/hyperimmune-egg-protein-decreases-submaximal-heart/2256/00005768. Accessed June 22, 2020.
  • Scheett TM, Martin TD, Carr BM, Webster MJ. A Comparison of Hyperimmune Egg Protein and Placebo for Efficacy and Safety Among Healthy Young Adults (poster). J Int Soc Sport Nutr 2009;6(S1):P8.
  • Suzuki H, Nomura S, Masaoka T, et al. Effect of dietary anti-Helicobacter pylori-urease immunoglobulin Y on Helicobacter pylori infection. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2004;20 suppl 1:185-92. View abstract.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
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