Overview

English walnut is a tree. The fruit (nut) is a popular food. The nut, the shell of the nut (hull), and the leaf are used to make medicine.

The nut is used as a part of the diet to lower cholesterol in people with high cholesterol. The nut, shell, and leaf are used for many other conditions, including diabetes, stomach problems, and skin conditions. But there is no good scientific research to support the use of English walnut for any of these other condiitons.

In foods, English walnut is commonly eaten as a snack, in baking, and in salads.

How does it work ?

The nut of the English walnut contains chemicals called fatty acids, which might be useful as part of a cholesterol-lowering diet. It also contains chemicals that can expand blood vessels, possibly improving circulation and the way the heart works. Some of these chemicals might also help with swelling, pain, and cancer.

Uses & Effectiveness ?

Possibly Effective for

  • High cholesterol. Eating walnuts as part of a low-fat diet seems to lower cholesterol. Total cholesterol and "bad cholesterol" (LDL) are decreased when walnuts are eaten instead of fatty foods and account for up to 20% of the calories in the diet. Substituting walnuts for other dietary fats also seems to improve the ratio between "good cholesterol" (HDL cholesterol) and total cholesterol in people with type 2 diabetes.

Insufficient Evidence for

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of English walnut for these uses.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: The fruit (nut), shell, and leaf of English walnut are LIKELY SAFE for most people when eaten in usual food amounts. There isn't enough reliable information to know if the fruit or shell are safe in the larger amounts used as medicine. The leaf extract is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken at doses up to 200 mg daily for up to 3 months. The leaf extract can cause diarrhea. English walnut bark is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. Taking the bark daily might increase the risk for tongue or lip cancer.

When applied to the skin: English walnut bark is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. It contains a chemical called juglone that can irritate the skin.

Special Precautions and Warnings

When taken by mouth: The fruit (nut), shell, and leaf of English walnut are LIKELY SAFE for most people when eaten in usual food amounts. There isn't enough reliable information to know if the fruit or shell are safe in the larger amounts used as medicine. The leaf extract is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken at doses up to 200 mg daily for up to 3 months. The leaf extract can cause diarrhea. English walnut bark is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. Taking the bark daily might increase the risk for tongue or lip cancer.

When applied to the skin: English walnut bark is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. It contains a chemical called juglone that can irritate the skin. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: The fruit (nut), leaf, and shell of English walnut are LIKELY SAFE in food amounts. But there isn't enough information to know if these parts are safe in the larger amounts used as medicine. Stay on the safe side and stick to food amounts. English walnut bark is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. Don't take English walnut bark by mouth or apply it to the skin if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Allergies to peanuts and tree nuts: People with peanut allergies are more likely to be allergic to nuts called "tree nuts." English walnut is a tree nut. People who are allergic to one tree nut are also more likely to have an allergy to at least one other tree nut. Doctors often advise people with peanut allergies and tree nut allergies to avoid eating any tree nuts unless you know that you are not allergic to them.

Interactions ?

We currently have no information for ENGLISH WALNUT overview.

Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
  • For high cholesterol: 8-11 English walnut nuts or 30-56 grams (about 1/4 to 1/2 cup) have been substituted for fats in the diet.
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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2020.