ARROWROOT

OTHER NAME(S):

Arrow-Root, Arrurruz, Dictame, Herbe aux Fl&egrave;ches, Maranta, Maranta arundinacea, Marante, Marante Arundinacée.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Arrowroot is a plant. People use starch taken from the root and rhizome (underground stem) to make medicine.

Arrowroot is used as a nutritional food for infants and for people recovering from illness. It is also used for stomach and intestinal disorders, including diarrhea.

Some people sooth painful gums and sore mouth by applying arrowroot directly to the affected area. Babies cut teeth on arrowroot cookies.

In foods, arrowroot is used as an ingredient in cooking. Arrowroot is often replaced with cheaper starches, including potato, corn, wheat, or rice starch.

How does it work?

There is some scientific evidence that arrowroot may help get rid of cholesterol in the body. There isn’t enough information to know how it works for stomach and intestinal problems or for other uses.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Intestinal problem (irritable bowel syndrome, IBS). Early research suggests that taking powdered arrowroot three times per day with meals for one month reduces stomach pain and diarrhea in people with IBS.
  • Soothing mucous membranes, such as the mouth and gum linings.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of arrowroot for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Arrowroot is LIKELY SAFE when the starch is used in foods. It is POSSIBLY SAFE when used as a medicine that is taken by mouth or applied to the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Arrowroot is POSSIBLY SAFE for pregnant and breast-feeding women when taken by mouth in food amounts. But larger medicinal amounts should be avoided until more is known.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for ARROWROOT Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of arrowroot depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for arrowroot. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Cooke, C., Carr, I., Abrams, K., and Mayberry, J. Arrowroot as a treatment for diarrhoea in irritable bowel syndrome patients: a pilot study. Arq Gastroenterol. 2000;37(1):20-24. View abstract.
  • Labbe, R., Somers, E., and Duncan, C. Influence of starch source on sporulation and enterotoxin production by Clostridium perfringens type A. Appl.Environ.Microbiol. 1976;31(3):455-457. View abstract.
  • Perez, E. and Lares, M. Chemical composition, mineral profile, and functional properties of Canna (Canna edulis) and Arrowroot (Maranta spp.) starches. Plant Foods Hum Nutr 2005;60(3):113-116. View abstract.
  • Rolston, D. D., Mathew, P., and Mathan, V. I. Food-based solutions are a viable alternative to glucose-electrolyte solutions for oral hydration in acute diarrhoea--studies in a rat model of secretory diarrhoea. Trans.R.Soc.Trop.Med Hyg. 1990;84(1):156-159. View abstract.

More Resources for ARROWROOT

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.