Overview

Strawberry is a plant. The fruit is eaten and used to make medicine. The leaves are also used to make medicine.

People use strawberry for diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

How does it work ?

Strawberry contains chemicals that are antioxidants and might keep cancer cells from multiplying. Other chemicals in strawberry might slow down the speed at which the nervous system ages. That's why some researchers are interested in studying whether strawberry might help prevent or treat Alzheimer's disease or other diseases that involve progressive loss of nerve function.

Uses & Effectiveness ?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Heart disease. It's unclear if strawberry can prevent heart disease. Clinical research shows that strawberry might reduce markers of swelling (inflammation) in the body. High levels of these markers have been linked to heart disease. But taking strawberry doesn't seem to improve other risk factors, such as blood pressure or cholesterol levels.
  • Diabetes. Early research suggests that taking strawberry might help to control blood sugar by a small amount in some people.
  • High levels of cholesterol or other fats (lipids) in the blood (hyperlipidemia). Early research shows that taking strawberry might help to reduce levels of LDL (or "bad") cholesterol, but it doesn't seem to improve levels of HDL (or "good") cholesterol or triglycerides.
  • High blood pressure. Early research suggests that taking strawberry does not reduce blood pressure in people with high blood pressure.
  • Obesity. Early research shows that taking strawberry does not seem to help with weight loss in people with obesity or abdominal obesity. It might help to control levels of fats in the blood in some people.
  • Osteoarthritis. Early research suggests that taking strawberry might help to improve pain in some people with osteoarthritis.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Fever.
  • Gout.
  • Nervous tension.
  • Night sweats.
  • Water retention.
  • Preventing menstruation.
  • Rashes, when applied to the skin.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of strawberry for these uses.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Strawberry is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts found in food. It is POSSIBLY SAFE when strawberry is frozen and dried (freeze-dried) and taken in amounts of up to 50 grams each day. Some people can have an allergic reaction to strawberry.

When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if strawberry is safe or what the side effects might be. Some people are allergic to strawberry.

Special Precautions and Warnings

When taken by mouth: Strawberry is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts found in food. It is POSSIBLY SAFE when strawberry is frozen and dried (freeze-dried) and taken in amounts of up to 50 grams each day. Some people can have an allergic reaction to strawberry.

When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if strawberry is safe or what the side effects might be. Some people are allergic to strawberry. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Strawberry is LIKELY SAFE for pregnant and breast-feeding women when taken by mouth in food amounts. There isn't enough reliable information to know if strawberry is safe to use in larger medicinal amounts when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Allergies to fruit related to strawberry: Strawberry may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Rosaceae family. Members of this family include apricot, almond, plum, peach, pear, and apple. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking strawberry.

Bleeding disorders: There is some concern that using strawberry in larger amounts might prolong bleeding time and increase the risk of bruising and bleeding in some people with bleeding disorders. If you have a bleeding disorder, use strawberry with caution.

Surgery: Using strawberry in larger amounts might slow blood clotting. There is some concern that it might increase the chance of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using strawberry at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions ?

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications moved by pumps in cells (P-glycoprotein Substrates) interacts with STRAWBERRY

    Some medications are moved by pumps into cells. Strawberry might make these pumps less active and increase how much of some medications get absorbed by the body. This might increase the side effects of some medications.

    Some medications that are moved by these pumps include etoposide, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, vindesine, ketoconazole, itraconazole, amprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, cimetidine, ranitidine, diltiazem, verapamil, corticosteroids, erythromycin, cisapride (Propulsid), fexofenadine (Allegra), cyclosporine, loperamide (Imodium), quinidine, and others.

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with STRAWBERRY

    Using larger amounts of strawberry might slow blood clotting. Taking strawberry along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding in some people.

    Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of strawberry depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for strawberry. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.
View References

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2020.