STRAWBERRY

OTHER NAME(S):

Alpine Strawberry, Fragaria collina, Fragaria insularis, Fragaria vesca, Fragaria virginiana, Fragaria viridis, Fragariae Folium, Fraise, Fraise Alpine, Fraise de Virginie, Fraise des Bois, Fraise des Bois Alpine Blanche, Fraise des Montagnes, Faise Sauvage, Fraisier, Fraisier Craquelin, Fraisier des Collines, Fraisier Vert, Fresa, Mountain Strawberry, Potentilla vesca, Potentilla virginiana, Potentilla viridis, Strawberries, Virginian Strawberry, Wild Strawberry, Wood Strawberry.

Overview

Overview Information

Strawberry is a plant. The fruit is eaten and used to make medicine. The leaves are also used to make medicine.

People use strawberry for diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

How does it work?

Strawberry contains chemicals that are antioxidants and might keep cancer cells from multiplying. Other chemicals in strawberry might slow down the speed at which the nervous system ages. That's why some researchers are interested in studying whether strawberry might help prevent or treat Alzheimer's disease or other diseases that involve progressive loss of nerve function.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Heart disease. It's unclear if strawberry can prevent heart disease. Clinical research shows that strawberry might reduce markers of swelling (inflammation) in the body. High levels of these markers have been linked to heart disease. But taking strawberry doesn't seem to improve other risk factors, such as blood pressure or cholesterol levels.
  • Diabetes. Early research suggests that taking strawberry might help to control blood sugar by a small amount in some people.
  • High levels of cholesterol or other fats (lipids) in the blood (hyperlipidemia). Early research shows that taking strawberry might help to reduce levels of LDL (or "bad") cholesterol, but it doesn't seem to improve levels of HDL (or "good") cholesterol or triglycerides.
  • High blood pressure. Early research suggests that taking strawberry does not reduce blood pressure in people with high blood pressure.
  • Obesity. Early research shows that taking strawberry does not seem to help with weight loss in people with obesity or abdominal obesity. It might help to control levels of fats in the blood in some people.
  • Osteoarthritis. Early research suggests that taking strawberry might help to improve pain in some people with osteoarthritis.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Fever.
  • Gout.
  • Nervous tension.
  • Night sweats.
  • Water retention.
  • Preventing menstruation.
  • Rashes, when applied to the skin.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of strawberry for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

When taken by mouth: Strawberry is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts found in food. It is POSSIBLY SAFE when strawberry is frozen and dried (freeze-dried) and taken in amounts of up to 50 grams each day. Some people can have an allergic reaction to strawberry.

When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if strawberry is safe or what the side effects might be. Some people are allergic to strawberry.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Strawberry is LIKELY SAFE for pregnant and breast-feeding women when taken by mouth in food amounts. There isn't enough reliable information to know if strawberry is safe to use in larger medicinal amounts when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Allergies to fruit related to strawberry: Strawberry may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Rosaceae family. Members of this family include apricot, almond, plum, peach, pear, and apple. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking strawberry.

Bleeding disorders: There is some concern that using strawberry in larger amounts might prolong bleeding time and increase the risk of bruising and bleeding in some people with bleeding disorders. If you have a bleeding disorder, use strawberry with caution.

Surgery: Using strawberry in larger amounts might slow blood clotting. There is some concern that it might increase the chance of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using strawberry at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for STRAWBERRY Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of strawberry depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for strawberry. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Cheel, J., Theoduloz, C., Rodriguez, J., Saud, G., Caligari, P. D., and Schmeda-Hirschmann, G. E-cinnamic acid derivatives and phenolics from Chilean strawberry fruits, Fragaria chiloensis ssp. chiloensis. J Agric.Food Chem 11-2-2005;53(22):8512-8518. View abstract.
  • Deferme, S., Van Gelder, J., and Augustijns, P. Inhibitory effect of fruit extracts on P-glycoprotein-related efflux carriers: an in-vitro screening. J Pharm Pharmacol 2002;54(9):1213-1219. View abstract.
  • Dutta-Roy, A. K., Crosbie, L., and Gordon, M. J. Effects of tomato extract on human platelet aggregation in vitro. Platelets. 2001;12(4):218-227. View abstract.
  • Felgines, C., Talavera, S., Gonthier, M. P., Texier, O., Scalbert, A., Lamaison, J. L., and Remesy, C. Strawberry anthocyanins are recovered in urine as glucuro- and sulfoconjugates in humans. J Nutr 2003;133(5):1296-1301. View abstract.
  • Halvorsen, B. L., Holte, K., Myhrstad, M. C., Barikmo, I., Hvattum, E., Remberg, S. F., Wold, A. B., Haffner, K., Baugerod, H., Andersen, L. F., Moskaug, O., Jacobs, D. R., Jr., and Blomhoff, R. A systematic screening of total antioxidants in dietary plants. J Nutr 2002;132(3):461-471. View abstract.
  • Kuriyama, S., Ebihara, S., Hozawa, A., Ohmori, K., Kurashima, K., Nakaya, N., Matsui, T., Arai, H., Tsubono, Y., Sasaki, H., and Tsuji, I. Dietary intakes and plasma 8-iso-prostaglandin F2alpha concentrations in community-dwelling elderly Japanese: the Tsurugaya project. Int J Vitam.Nutr Res 2006;76(2):87-94. View abstract.
  • Lee, S. Y., Choi, K. Y., Kim, M. K., Kim, K. M., Lee, J. H., Meng, K. H., and Lee, W. C. [The relationship between intake of vegetables and fruits and colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence]. Korean J Gastroenterol 2005;45(1):23-33. View abstract.
  • Mazur, W. M., Uehara, M., Wahala, K., and Adlercreutz, H. Phyto-oestrogen content of berries, and plasma concentrations and urinary excretion of enterolactone after a single strawberry-meal in human subjects. Br.J Nutr. 2000;83(4):381-387. View abstract.
  • Meyers, K. J., Watkins, C. B., Pritts, M. P., and Liu, R. H. Antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of strawberries. J.Agric.Food Chem. 11-5-2003;51(23):6887-6892. View abstract.
  • Naemura, A., Mitani, T., Ijiri, Y., Tamura, Y., Yamashita, T., Okimura, M., and Yamamoto, J. Anti-thrombotic effect of strawberries. Blood Coagul.Fibrinolysis 2005;16(7):501-509. View abstract.
  • Pajk, T., Rezar, V., Levart, A., and Salobir, J. Efficiency of apples, strawberries, and tomatoes for reduction of oxidative stress in pigs as a model for humans. Nutrition 2006;22(4):376-384. View abstract.
  • Van Gelder, J., Deferme, S., Naesens, L., De Clercq, E., van den, Mooter G., Kinget, R., and Augustijns, P. Intestinal absorption enhancement of the ester prodrug tenofovir disoproxil fumarate through modulation of the biochemical barrier by defined ester mixtures. Drug Metab Dispos. 2002;30(8):924-930. View abstract.
  • Aaby K, Skrede G, Wrolstad RE. Phenolic composition and antioxidant activities in flesh and achenes of strawberries (Fragaria ananassa). J Agric Food Chem 2005;53:4032-40.. View abstract.
  • Amani R, Moazen S, Shahbazian H, Ahmadi K, Jalali MT. Flavonoid-rich beverage effects on lipid profile and blood pressure in diabetic patients. World J Diabetes. 2014;5(6):962-8. View abstract.
  • Basu A, Betts NM, Nguyen A, Newman ED, Fu D, Lyons TJ. Freeze-dried strawberries lower serum cholesterol and lipid peroxidation in adults with abdominal adiposity and elevated serum lipids. J Nutr. 2014;144(6):830-7. View abstract.
  • Basu A, Kurien BT, Tran H, et al. Strawberries decrease circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor and lipid peroxides in obese adults with knee osteoarthritis. Food Funct. 2018;9(12):6218-6226. View abstract.
  • Cabrera-Freitag P, Bermejo Becerro A, Abreu Ramírez MG, et al. Allergy to strawberry in children from the Mediterranean area: is it really allergy? J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2020;30(4):283-5. View abstract.
  • Feresin RG, Johnson SA, Pourafshar S, et al. Impact of daily strawberry consumption on blood pressure and arterial stiffness in pre- and stage 1-hypertensive postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial. Food Funct. 2017;8(11):4139-4149. View abstract.
  • Gao Q, Qin LQ, Arafa A, Eshak ES, Dong JY. Effects of strawberry intervention on cardiovascular risk factors: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Br J Nutr 2020;124(3):241-6. View abstract.
  • Grattan CE, Harman RR. Contact urticaria to strawberry. Contact Dermatitis 1985;13:191-2. . View abstract.
  • Hadi A, Askarpour M, Miraghajani M, Symonds ME, Sheikhi A, Ghaedi E. Effects of strawberry supplementation on cardiovascular risk factors: a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Food Funct 2019;10(11):6987-98. View abstract.
  • Heo HJ, Lee CY. Strawberry and its anthocyanins reduce oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. J Agric Food Chem 2005;53:1984-9. . View abstract.
  • Huang Y, Park E, Edirisinghe I, Burton-Freeman BM. Maximizing the health effects of strawberry anthocyanins: understanding the influence of the consumption timing variable. Food Funct. 2016;7(12):4745-4752. View abstract.
  • Joseph JA, Shukitt-Hale B, Denisova NA, et al. Long-term dietary strawberry, spinach, or vitamin E supplementation retards the onset of age-related neuronal signal-transduction and cognitive behavioral deficits. J Neurosci 1998;18:8047-55. View abstract.
  • Joseph JA, Shukitt-Hale B, Denisova NA, et al. Reversals of age-related declines in neuronal signal transduction, cognitive, and motor behavioral deficits with blueberry, spinach, or strawberry dietary supplementation. J Neurosci 1999;19:8114-21. View abstract.
  • Klopotek Y, Otto K, Bohm V. Processing strawberries to different products alters contents of vitamin C, total phenolics, total anthocyanins, and antioxidant capacity. J Agric Food Chem 2005;53:5640-6.. View abstract.
  • Moazen S, Amani R, Homayouni Rad A, Shahbazian H, Ahmadi K, Taha Jalali M. Effects of freeze-dried strawberry supplementation on metabolic biomarkers of atherosclerosis in subjects with type 2 diabetes: a randomized double-blind controlled trial. Ann Nutr Metab. 2013;63(3):256-64. View abstract.
  • Ramos S, Alia M, Bravo L, Goya L. Comparative effects of food-derived polyphenols on the viability and apoptosis of a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2). J Agric Food Chem 2005;53:1271-80. . View abstract.
  • Richter CK, Skulas-Ray AC, Gaugler TL, Lambert JD, Proctor DN, Kris-Etherton PM. Incorporating freeze-dried strawberry powder into a high-fat meal does not alter postprandial vascular function or blood markers of cardiovascular disease risk: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2017;105(2):313-322. View abstract.
  • Rodriguez J, Crespo JF, Lopez-Rubio A, et al. Clinical cross-reactivity among foods of the Rosaceae family. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2000;106:183-189. View abstract.
  • Sandhu AK, Miller MG, Thangthaeng N, et al. Metabolic fate of strawberry polyphenols after chronic intake in healthy older adults. Food Funct. 2018;9(1):96-106. View abstract.
  • Schell J, Scofield RH, Barrett JR, et al. Strawberries improve pain and inflammation in obese adults with radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis. Nutrients. 2017;9(9):949. View abstract.
  • Wang SY, Feng R, Lu Y, et al. Inhibitory effect on activator protein-1, nuclear factor-kappaB, and cell transformation by extracts of strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.). J Agric Food Chem 2005;53:4187-93. . View abstract.
  • Wang SY, Jiao H. Scavenging capacity of berry crops on superoxide radicals, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radicals, and singlet oxygen. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48:5677-84.. View abstract.
  • Wang SY, Lin HS. Antioxidant activity in fruits and leaves of blackberry, raspberry, and strawberry varies with cultivar and developmental stage. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48:140-6.. View abstract.
  • Xiao D, Sandhu A, Huang Y, Park E, Edirisinghe I, Burton-Freeman BM. The effect of dietary factors on strawberry anthocyanins oral bioavailability. Food Funct. 2017;8(11):3970-3979. View abstract.
  • Zunino SJ, Parelman MA, Freytag TL, et al. Effects of dietary strawberry powder on blood lipids and inflammatory markers in obese human subjects. Br J Nutr. 2012;108(5):900-9. View abstract.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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