PECTIN

OTHER NAME(S):

Acide Pectinique, Acide Pectique, Apple Pectin, Citrus Pectin, Fractionated Pectin, Fruit Pectin, Grapefruit Pectin, Lemon Pectin, MCP, Modified Citrus Pectin, Pectina, Pectine, Pectine d'Agrume, Pectine d'Agrume Modifiée, Pectine de Citron, Pectine de Fruit, Pectine de Pamplemousse, Pectine de Pomme, Pectinic Acid.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Pectin is a fiber found in fruits. It is used to make medicine.

People use pectin for high cholesterol, high triglycerides, and to prevent colon cancer and prostate cancer. It is also used for diabetes and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Some people use pectin to prevent poisoning caused by lead, strontium, and other heavy metals. Pectin is also used to reduce the skin flushing associated with taking niacin.

Pectin was used for years in combination with kaolin (Kaopectate) to control diarrhea. However, in April 2003, the FDA found ruled that scientific evidence does not support the use of pectin for diarrhea. Since April 2004, pectin has not been permitted as an anti-diarrhea agent in over-the-counter (OTC) products. As a result, Kaopectate no longer contains pectin and kaolin.

Some people apply pectin to the skin to protect raw or ulcerated mouth and throat sores.

Pectin is used as a thickening agent in cooking and baking. In manufacturing, pectin is an ingredient in some denture adhesives.

How does it work?

Pectin binds substances in the intestine and adds bulk to the stools.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Possibly Effective for

  • High cholesterol. Taking pectin by mouth seems to lower cholesterol. Taking it along with guar gum and small amounts of insoluble fiber lowers total and "bad" low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. However, the combination doesn't seem to affect "good" high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol or triglycerides.

Possibly Ineffective for

  • Prediabetes. Drinking beverages containing sugar beet pectin does not seem to lower blood sugar levels in people with prediabetes.
  • Stomach ulcers. Taking apple pectin for 6 months does not seem to reduce the recurrence of ulcers in the small intestine.

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Diarrhea in young children. Pectin seems to shorten bouts of diarrhea and vomiting and lessen the need for replacement fluids in children aged 5-12 months from developing nations who experience ongoing diarrhea.
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children with cerebral palsy. Early research shows that giving pectin along with "tube feeding" reduces some symptoms of GERD such as vomiting, cough, and wheezing in children with cerebral palsy.
  • Mercury toxicity. Early research shows that taking pectin helps eliminate mercury through the urine and decreases the duration of mercury toxicity in children with this condition.
  • Niacin-induced flushing. Taking pectin before using the drug niacin seems to reduce how long skin flushing lasts. But it doesn't prevent skin flushing from occurring or reduce its severity.
  • Prostate cancer. Early research suggests that taking a specific modified citrus pectin product (Pectasol by Econugenics) after prostate surgery or radiation might lengthen the time to prostate cancer recurrence.
  • Colon cancer.
  • Damage from radiation.
  • Heartburn.
  • Infection.
  • Mouth and throat sores.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate pectin for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

In most people, including adults, children, and women who are pregnant or breast-feeding, pectin is LIKELY SAFE when taken in food amounts and POSSIBLY SAFE when used in larger medicinal amounts.

When taken by mouth alone or in combination with guar gum and insoluble fiber (the combination used to lower cholesterol and other blood fats), pectin can cause stomach cramps, diarrhea, gas, and loose stools.

People who are exposed to pectin dust at work, such as in manufacturing, may develop asthma.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Antibiotics (Tetracycline antibiotics) interacts with PECTIN

    Pectin might decrease the amount of tetracycline antibiotics that can be absorbed. Taking pectin with tetracycline antibiotics might decrease the effectiveness of tetracyclines. To avoid this interaction take pectin two hours before or four hours after taking tetracycline antibiotics.<br/><br/> Some tetracycline antibiotics include demeclocycline (Declomycin), minocycline (Minocin), and tetracycline (Achromycin).

  • Digoxin (Lanoxin) interacts with PECTIN

    Pectin is high in fiber. Fiber can decrease the absorption and decrease the effectiveness of digoxin (Lanoxin). As a general rule, any medications taken by mouth should be taken one hour before or four hours after pectin to prevent this interaction.

  • Lovastatin (Mevacor) interacts with PECTIN

    Lovastatin (Mevacor) is used to help lower cholesterol. Pectin might decrease how much lovastatin (Mevacor) the body absorbs and decrease the effectiveness of lovastatin (Mevacor). To avoid this interaction take pectin at least one hour after lovastatin (Mevacor).

Dosing

Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For high cholesterol: Up to 15 grams of pectin per day have been used.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Food and Drug Administration. Warning Letter to Ayoula Dublin regarding Lipostabil. July 22, 2003.
  • Guan R, Ho KY, Kang JY, et al. The effect of polyunsaturated phosphatidyl choline in the treatment of acute viral hepatitis. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 1995;9:699-703. View abstract.
  • Hasengschwandtner F. Phosphatidylcholine treatment to induce lipolysis. Cosmet Dermatol 2005;4:308-13. View abstract.
  • Hexsel D, Serra M, Mazzuco R, et al. Phosphatidylcholine in the treatment of localized fat. J Drugs Dermatol 2003;2:511-8. View abstract.
  • Hexsel DM, Serra M, de Oliveira Dal'Forno T, et al. Cosmetic uses of injectable phosphatidylcholine on the face. Otolaryngol Clin North Am 2005;38:1119-29. View abstract.
  • Jenkins PJ, Portmann BP, Eddleston AL, Williams R. Use of polyunsaturated phosphatidyl choline in HBsAg negative chronic active hepatitis: results of prospective double-blind controlled trial. Liver 1982;2:77-81. View abstract.
  • Karner M, Kocjan A, Stein J, et al. First multicenter study of modified release phosphatidylcholine "LT-02" in ulcerative colitis: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial in mesalazine-refractory courses. Am J Gastroenterol 2014;109(7):1041-51. View abstract.
  • Koo SI, Noh SK. Phosphatidylcholine inhibits and lysophosphatidylcholine enhances the lymphatic absorption of alpha-tocopherol in adult rats. J Nutr 2001;131:717-22.. View abstract.
  • Kopera D, Binder B, Toplak H, et al. Histopathologic changes after intralesional application of phosphatidylcholine for lipoma reduction: report of a case. Am J Dermatopathol 2006;28:331-3. View abstract.
  • Ladd SL, Sommer SA, LaBerge S, Toscano W. Effect of phosphatidylcholine on explicit memory. Clin Neuropharmacol 1993;16:540-9. View abstract.
  • Lieber CS, Leo MA, Aleynik S, et al. Increased circulating level of dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine is associated with protection against alcohol induced oxidative stress and liver fibrosis in man. Hepatology 2000;32:386A.
  • Loguercio C, Andreone P, Brisc C, et al. Silybin combined with phosphatidylcholine and vitamin E in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a randomized controlled trial. Free Radic Biol Med 2012;52(9):1658-65. View abstract.
  • Merin JP, Matsuyama M, Kira T, et al. Alpha-lipoic acid blocks HIV-1 LTR-dependent expression of hygromycin resistance in THP-1 stable transformants. FEBS Lett 1996;394:9-13. View abstract.
  • Morganti P, Berardesca E, Guarneri B, et al. Topical clindamycin 1% vs. linoleic acid-rich phosphatidylcholine and nicotinamide 4% in the treatment of acne: a multicentre-randomized trial. Int J Cosmet Sci 2011;33(5):467-76. View abstract.
  • Niederau C, Strohmeyer G, Heintges T, et al. Polyunsaturated phosphatidyl-choline and interferon alpha for treatment of chronic hepatitis B and C: a multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Leich Study Group. Hepatogastroenterology 1998;45:797-804. View abstract.
  • Phosphatidylcholine. Altern Med Rev 2002;7(2):150-4. View abstract.
  • Rittes PG. The use of phosphatidylcholine for correction of localized fat deposits. Aesthetic Plast Surg 2003;27:315-8. View abstract.
  • Rittes PG. The use of phosphatidylcholine for correction of lower lid bulging due to prominent fat pads. Dermatol Surg 2001;27:391-2. View abstract.
  • Rotunda AM, Kolodney MS. Mesotherapy and phosphatidylcholine injections: historical clarification and review. Dermatol Surg 2006;32:465-80. View abstract.
  • Stremmel W, Braun A, Hanemann A, Ehehalt R, Autschbach F, Karner M. Delayed release phosphatidylcholine in chronic-active ulcerative colitis: a randomized, double-blinded, dose finding study. J Clin Gastroenterol 2010;44(5):e101-7. View abstract.
  • Stremmel W, Ehehalt R, Autschbach F, Karner M. Phosphatidylcholine for steroid-refractory chronic ulcerative colitis: a randomized trial. Ann Intern Med. 2007;147(9):603-10. View abstract.
  • Symons C, Fortune F, Greenbaum RA, Dandona P. Cardiac hypertrophy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and hyperparathyroidism-an association. Br Heart J 1985;54:539-42. View abstract.
  • Wade A, Weller PJ, eds. Handbook of Pharmaceutical Excipients. 2nd ed. Washington, DC: Am Pharmaceutical Assn, 1994.
  • Domino EF, May WW, Demetriou S, et al. Lack of clinically significant improvement of patients with tardive dyskinesia following phosphatidylcholine therapy. Biol Psychiatry 1985;20:1189-96. View abstract.
  • Eastwood, M. and Kritchevsky, D. Dietary fiber: how did we get where we are? Annu Rev Nutr 2005;25:1-8. View abstract.
  • Hayashi, A., Gillen, A. C., and Lott, J. R. Effects of daily oral administration of quercetin chalcone and modified citrus pectin on implanted colon-25 tumor growth in Balb-c mice. Altern Med Rev 2000;5(6):546-552. View abstract.
  • Hsieh, T. C. and Wu, J. M. Changes in cell growth, cyclin/kinase, endogenous phosphoproteins and nm23 gene expression in human prostatic JCA-1 cells treated with modified citrus pectin. Biochem Mol.Biol Int 1995;37(5):833-841. View abstract.
  • Kang, J. Y., Tay, H. H., Guan, R., Math, M. V., Yap, I., and Labrooy, S. J. Dietary supplementation with pectin in the maintenance treatment of duodenal ulcer. A controlled study. Scand J Gastroenterol 1988;23(1):95-99. View abstract.
  • Modified citrus pectin-monograph. Altern Med Rev 2000;5(6):573-575. View abstract.
  • Nangia-Makker, P., Hogan, V., Honjo, Y., Baccarini, S., Tait, L., Bresalier, R., and Raz, A. Inhibition of human cancer cell growth and metastasis in nude mice by oral intake of modified citrus pectin. J Natl.Cancer Inst 12-18-2002;94(24):1854-1862. View abstract.
  • Pienta, K. J., Naik, H., Akhtar, A., Yamazaki, K., Replogle, T. S., Lehr, J., Donat, T. L., Tait, L., Hogan, V., and Raz, A. Inhibition of spontaneous metastasis in a rat prostate cancer model by oral administration of modified citrus pectin. J Natl.Cancer Inst 3-1-1995;87(5):348-353. View abstract.
  • Sanaka, M., Yamamoto, T., Anjiki, H., Nagasawa, K., and Kuyama, Y. Effects of agar and pectin on gastric emptying and post-prandial glycaemic profiles in healthy human volunteers. Clin Exp.Pharmacol.Physiol 2007;34(11):1151-1155. View abstract.
  • Schwab, U., Louheranta, A., Torronen, A., and Uusitupa, M. Impact of sugar beet pectin and polydextrose on fasting and postprandial glycemia and fasting concentrations of serum total and lipoprotein lipids in middle-aged subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism. Eur J Clin Nutr 2006;60(9):1073-1080. View abstract.
  • Sobolev, M. B., Khatskel', S. B., and Muradov, A. I. [Enterosorption by nonstarch polysaccharides as a method of treatment of children with mercury poisoning]. Vopr.Pitan. 1999;68(1):28-30. View abstract.
  • Albert KS, Ayres JW, DiSanto AR, et al. Influence of kaolin-pectin suspension on digoxin bioavailability. J Pharm Sci 1978;67:1582-6. View abstract.
  • Albert KS, Welch RD, DeSante KA, et al. Decreased tetracycline bioavailability caused by a bismuth subsalicylate antidiarrheal mixture. J Pharm Sci 1979;68:586-8. View abstract.

Vitamins Survey

Have you ever purchased PECTIN?

Did you or will you purchase this product in-store or online?

Where did you or where do you plan to purchase this product?

Where did you or where do you plan to purchase this product?

What factors influenced or will influence your purchase? (check all that apply)

Vitamins Survey

Where did you or where do you plan to purchase this product?

Do you buy vitamins online or instore?

What factors are most important to you? (check all that apply)

More Resources for PECTIN

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.