LIME

OTHER NAME(S):

Adam's Apple, Bara Nimbu, Bijapura, Citron Vert, Citronnier Vert, Citrus acida, Citrus aurantifolia, Citrus lima, Citrus limetta var. aromatica, Citrus medica var. acida, Huile de Lime, Italian Limetta, Key Lime, Lima, Lime Oil, Limette, Limettier, Limonia aurantifolia, Turanj.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Lime is a citrus fruit. The juice, fruit, peel, and oil are used to make medicine. Oil pressed from the crushed fruit is known as “distilled lime oil.” Oil pressed from the unripe peel is known as “expressed lime oil.”

Lime juice is used for severe diarrhea (dysentery).

Some people apply lime oil directly to the skin to kill germs, treat nausea, and as a stimulant.

In cosmetics, lime oil is used as a fragrance component and as a “fixative.”

How does it work?

There isn't enough information to know how lime works.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Iron deficiency. Early research suggests that drinking one liter of lime juice per day for 6 days per week for 8 months does not improve low iron levels in women who eat foods containing iron that is difficult for the body to absorb.
  • Severe diarrhea (dysentery).
  • Nausea.
  • Killing germs on the skin.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of lime for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Lime is LIKELY SAFE for most adults when used in amounts found in foods.

Lime peel is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts.

Applying lime oil directly to the skin is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. Some people are sensitive to lime oil when it is applied directly to the skin. Lime oil can cause the skin to be very sensitive to the sunlight. Wear sunblock and protective clothing outside, especially if you are light-skinned.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking lime if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid using lime in amounts greater than what is normally found in food.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates) interacts with LIME

    Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver.<br><nb>Lime juice might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Drinking lime juice while taking some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of these medications. Before taking lime, talk to your healthcare provider if you are taking any medications that are changed by the liver.<br><nb>Some medications changed by the liver include lovastatin (Mevacor), ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), fexofenadine (Allegra), triazolam (Halcion), and many others.

  • Medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight (Photosensitizing drugs) interacts with LIME

    Some medications can increase sensitivity to sunlight. Lime oil might also increase your sensitivity to sunlight. Using lime oil along with medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight could increase the chances of sunburn, and blistering or rashes on areas of skin exposed to sunlight. Be sure to wear sunblock and protective clothing when spending time in the sun.<br><nb>Some drugs that cause photosensitivity include amitriptyline (Elavil), Ciprofloxacin (Cipro), norfloxacin (Noroxin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), ofloxacin (Floxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), gatifloxacin (Tequin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Septra), tetracycline, methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen, 8-MOP, Oxsoralen), and Trioxsalen (Trisoralen).

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of lime depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for lime. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Coffman, K., Boyce, W. T., and Hansen, R. C. Phytophotodermatitis simulating child abuse. Am.J Dis.Child 1985;139(3):239-240. View abstract.
  • Garcia, O. P., Diaz, M., Rosado, J. L., and Allen, L. H. Ascorbic acid from lime juice does not improve the iron status of iron-deficient women in rural Mexico. Am.J.Clin.Nutr. 2003;78(2):267-273. View abstract.
  • Gharagozloo, M. and Ghaderi, A. Immunomodulatory effect of concentrated lime juice extract on activated human mononuclear cells. J.Ethnopharmacol. 2001;77(1):85-90. View abstract.
  • Gill, J. S. and Bhagat, C. I. Acute copper poisoning from drinking lime cordial prepared and left overnight in an old urn. Med.J.Aust. 5-17-1999;170(10):510. View abstract.
  • Leung, A. Y. and Foster, F. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Food, Drugs and Cosmetics. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons;1996.
  • Lim, S. L. and Lim, L. Y. Effects of citrus fruit juices on cytotoxicity and drug transport pathways of Caco-2 cell monolayers. Int J Pharm 1-3-2006;307(1):42-50. View abstract.
  • Lissera, R. G., Luna Maldonado, E. R., and Battellino, L. J. In vitro erosive capacity of some fruit juices and soft or low alcoholic strength beverages on human teeth. Acta Odontol.Latinoam. 1998;11(1):55-71. View abstract.
  • Paine, M. F., Criss, A. B., and Watkins, P. B. Two major grapefruit juice components differ in time to onset of intestinal CYP3A4 inhibition. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2005;312(3):1151-1160. View abstract.
  • Rodrigues, A., Brun, H., and Sandstrom, A. Risk factors for cholera infection in the initial phase of an epidemic in Guinea-Bissau: protection by lime juice. Am.J.Trop.Med.Hyg. 1997;57(5):601-604. View abstract.
  • Rodrigues, A., Sandstrom, A., Ca, T., Steinsland, H., Jensen, H., and Aaby, P. Protection from cholera by adding lime juice to food - results from community and laboratory studies in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Trop.Med.Int.Health 2000;5(6):418-422. View abstract.
  • Rowe, A. K., Angulo, F. J., and Tauxe, R. V. A lime in a litre rapidly kills toxogenic Vibrio cholerae O1. Trop.Doct. 1998;28(4):247-248. View abstract.
  • Wagner, A. M., Wu, J. J., Hansen, R. C., Nigg, H. N., and Beiere, R. C. Bullous phytophotodermatitis associated with high natural concentrations of furanocoumarins in limes. Am.J Contact Dermat. 2002;13(1):10-14. View abstract.
  • Weber, I. C., Davis, C. P., and Greeson, D. M. Phytophotodermatitis: the other "lime" disease. J Emerg.Med 1999;17(2):235-237. View abstract.
  • Xu, J., Go, M. L., and Lim, L. Y. Modulation of digoxin transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers by citrus fruit juices: lime, lemon, grapefruit, and pummelo. Pharm.Res. 2003;20(2):169-176. View abstract.
  • Bailey DG, Dresser GK, Bend JR. Bergamottin, lime juice, and red wine as inhibitors of cytochrome P450 3A4 activity: comparison with grapefruit juice. Clin Pharmacol Ther 2003;73:529-37. View abstract.
  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182
  • Naganuma M, Hirose S, Nakayama Y, et al. A study of the phototoxicity of lemon oil. Arch Dermatol Res 1985;278:31-6. . View abstract.
  • Roesyanto-Mahadi ID, Geursen-Reitsma AM, van Joost T, et al. Sensitization to fragrance materials in Indonesian cosmetics. Contact Dermatitis 1990;22:212-7. View abstract.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.