MARSHMALLOW

OTHER NAME(S):

Altea, Alteia, Althaea officinalis, Althaea taurinensis, Althaeae Folium, Althaeae Radi, Althea, Althée, Guimauve, Guimauve Officinale, Gulkhairo, Herba Malvae, Mallards, Malvavisco, Marsh Maillo, Mauve Blanche, Mortification Root, Racine de Guimauve, Sweet Weed, Wymote.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Marshmallow is a plant. The leaves and the root are used to make medicine. Don’t confuse marshmallow with the mallow (Malva sylvestris) flower and leaf.

Marshmallow leaf and root are commonly used by mouth to treat stomach ulcers, diarrhea, constipation, swelling of the stomach lining, and pain and swelling of the mucous membranes that line the respiratory tract. But there is limited scientific evidence to support these and other uses.

In foods, marshmallow leaf and root are used as a flavoring agent.

How does it work?

Marshmallow forms a protective layer on the skin and lining of the digestive tract. It also contains chemicals that might decrease cough and help heal wounds by decreasing inflammation and fighting certain "bugs".(microbes).

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Cough caused by ACE inhibitors. Medications used for high blood pressure called ACE inhibitors can sometimes cause coughing as a side effect. Early research suggests that taking marshmallow root by mouth for 4 weeks can reduce cough caused by ACE inhibitors. Some examples of ACE-inhibitors include captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril).
  • Breast pain and swelling cause by breast feeding. Early research suggests that applying a compress containing marshmallow to the breast along with standard techniques can improve pain and swelling caused by breast feeding. Standard techniques include breast massage and use of warm and cold compresses before and after breast feeding.
  • Skin infection caused by parasites (Leishmania lesions). Early research suggests that applying a combination of marshmallow and Althaea rosa extracts to affected skin for 5 days can help improve Leishmania lesions.
  • Sores.
  • Skin inflammation.
  • Burns.
  • Wounds.
  • Insect bites.
  • Chapped skin.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Constipation.
  • Stomach and intestinal ulcers.
  • Irritation of the mouth and throat.
  • Dry cough.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of marshmallow for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Marshmallow is LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth. In some people, it might cause low blood sugar levels.

Marshmallow is POSSIBLY SAFE when applied directly to the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of marshmallow during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorders: Taking marshmallow might increase your risk of bleeding. Diabetes: There is a concern that marshmallow might interfere with blood sugar control. If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar carefully to avoid dangerously low blood sugar.

Surgery: Marshmallow might affect blood sugar levels and slows blood clotting. There is a concern that it could interfere with blood sugar control and increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgical procedures. Stop taking marshmallow at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Lithium interacts with MARSHMALLOW

    Marshamallow might have an effect like a water pill or "diuretic." Taking marshmallow might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this product if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be changed.

  • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with MARSHMALLOW

    Marshmallow might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking marshmallow along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.<br/><br/> Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

  • Medications taken by mouth (Oral drugs) interacts with MARSHMALLOW

    Marshmallow contains a type of soft fiber called mucilage. Mucilage can decrease how much medicine the body absorbs. Taking marshmallow at the same time you take medications by mouth can decrease the effectiveness of your medication. To prevent this interaction take marshmallow at least one hour after medications you take by mouth.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of marshmallow for use as treatment depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for marshmallow. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Beaune, A. and Balea, T. [Anti-inflammatory experimental properties of marshmallow: its potentiating action on the local effects of corticoids]. Therapie 1966;21(2):341-347. View abstract.
  • Bone K. Marshmallow soothes cough. Br J Phytother 1993;3(2):93.
  • Cravotto, G., Boffa, L., Genzini, L., and Garella, D. Phytotherapeutics: an evaluation of the potential of 1000 plants. J Clin Pharm Ther 2010;35(1):11-48. View abstract.
  • Franz, G. and Chladek, M. [Comparative studies on the composition of crude mucus from crossbred descendants of Althaea officinalis L. and Althaea armeniaca Ten]. Pharmazie 1973;28(2):128-129. View abstract.
  • Gudej J. Flavonoids, phenolic acids and coumarins from the roots of Althaea officinalis. Planta Med 1991;57:284-285.
  • Huriez, C. and Fagez, C. [An association of marshmallow-dexamethasone: the pommade Dexalta]. Lille.Med 1968;13(2):121-123. View abstract.
  • Meyer E. Behandlung akuter und chronischer Bronchitiden mit Heilpflanzen. Therapiewoche 1956;6:537-540.
  • Muller-Limmroth, W. and Frohlich, H. H. [Effect of various phytotherapeutic expectorants on mucociliary transport]. Fortschr Med 1-24-1980;98(3):95-101. View abstract.
  • Nosal'ova, G., Strapkova, A., Kardosova, A., Capek, P., Zathurecky, L., and Bukovska, E. [Antitussive action of extracts and polysaccharides of marsh mallow (Althea officinalis L., var. robusta)]. Pharmazie 1992;47(3):224-226. View abstract.
  • Piovano, P. B. and Mazzocchi, S. [Clinical trial of a steroid derivative (9-alpha-fluoro-prednisolone-21- acetate) in association with aqueous extract of althea in the dermatological field]. G Ital Dermatol.Minerva Dermatol. 1970;45(4):279-286. View abstract.
  • Recio MC and et al. Antimicrobial activity of selected plants employed in the Spanish Mediterranean area, Part II. Phytother Res 1989;3:77-80.
  • Rouhi, H Ganji F. Effect of Althaea officinalis on cough associated with ACE inhibitors. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition 2007;6:256-258.
  • Scheffer J and König W. Einfluss von Radix althaeae und Flores chamomillae Extrakten auf Entzündungsreaktionen humaner neutrophiler Granulozyten, Monozyten und Rattenmastzellen. Abstracts of 3rd Phytotherapie-Kongress 1991;Abstract P9.
  • Tomoda, M., Shimizu, N., Oshima, Y., Takahashi, M., Murakami, M., and Hikino, H. Hypoglycemic activity of twenty plant mucilages and three modified products. Planta Med 1987;53(1):8-12. View abstract.
  • Zerehsaz, F., Salmanpour, R., Handijani, F., Ardehali, S., Panjehshahin, M. R., Tabei, S. Z., and Tabatabaee, H. R. A double-blind randomized clinical trial of a topical herbal extract (Z- HE) vs. systemic meglumine antimoniate for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Iran. Int J Dermatol 1999;38(8):610-612. View abstract.
  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182
  • Hage-Sleiman R, Mroueh M, Daher CF. Pharmacological evaluation of aqueous extract of Althaea officinalis flower grown in Lebanon. Pharm Biol 2011;49(3):327-33. View abstract.
  • Khosravan S, Mohammadzadeh-Moghadam H, Mohammadzadeh F, Fadafen SA, Gholami M. The effect of hollyhock (Althaea officinalis L) leaf compresses combined with warm and cold compress on breast engorgement in lactating women: a randomized clinical trial. J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med 2017;22(1):25-30. View abstract.
  • Rezaei M, Dadgar Z, Noori-Zadeh A, Mesbah-Namin SA, Pakzad I, Davodian E. Evaluation of the antibacterial activity of the Althaea officinalis L. leaf extract and its wound healing potency in the rat model of excision wound creation. Avicenna J Phytomed 2015;5(2):105-12. View abstract.
  • Sadighara P, Gharibi S, Moghadam Jafari A, Jahed Khaniki G, Salari S. The antioxidant and flavonoids contents of Althaea officinalis L. flowers based on their color. Avicenna J Phytomed 2012;2(3):113-7. View abstract.

More Resources for MARSHMALLOW

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.