Overview

Celery (Apium graveolens) is a plant that grows throughout the world. The stem is often eaten raw or as a cooked vegetable. The seed is used as a spice.

The chemicals in different parts of the celery plant might have many effects on the body, including lowering blood sugar and blood pressure, and causing sleepiness.

People use celery to repel mosquitos, for prediabetes, gout, rheumatoid arthritis, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

Uses & Effectiveness ?

Possibly Effective for

  • Mosquito repellent. Some research shows that applying a gel containing 5% to 25% celery extract to the skin can repel mosquitos for up to 4.5 hours. Other research shows that applying a specific product containing celery extract 5%, vanillin, eucalyptus oil, orange oil, and citronella oil, repels mosquitoes similarly to other commercial products, such as DEET 25% and Insect Block 28.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Celery stems, oil, and seeds are commonly consumed in foods. Celery is possibly safe when the seed is used as medicine, short-term. But some people are allergic to celery. Allergic reactions can range from skin rashes to anaphylaxis. Celery can also cause sensitivity to the sun.

When applied to the skin: Celery is possibly safe for most people when used short-term. Some people are allergic to celery. Allergic reactions can range from skin rashes to anaphylaxis. Celery can also cause sensitivity to the sun.

Special Precautions and Warnings

When taken by mouth: Celery stems, oil, and seeds are commonly consumed in foods. Celery is possibly safe when the seed is used as medicine, short-term. But some people are allergic to celery. Allergic reactions can range from skin rashes to anaphylaxis. Celery can also cause sensitivity to the sun.

When applied to the skin: Celery is possibly safe for most people when used short-term. Some people are allergic to celery. Allergic reactions can range from skin rashes to anaphylaxis. Celery can also cause sensitivity to the sun. Pregnancy: Celery oil and celery seeds are likely unsafe when taken by mouth during pregnancy in the amounts found in medicine. Large amounts of celery might make the uterus contract and cause a miscarriage. Stick to food amounts.

Breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if it is safe to use celery when breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and stick to food amounts.

Allergies: Celery can cause allergic reactions in people who are sensitive to some other plants and spices, including wild carrot, mugwort, birch, caraway, fennel or coriander seeds, parsley, anise, plantain, and dandelion. This has been called the "celery-carrot-mugwort-spice syndrome," or the "celery-mugwort-birch-spice" syndrome.

Bleeding disorders: Celery root might increase the risk of bleeding when used in medicinal amounts. Don't use celery root if you have a bleeding disorder.

Thyroid conditions: Celery might interfere with thyroid function. Don't use celery if you have high or low thyroid levels or are taking medication for a thyroid disorder.

Interactions ?

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid, Levoxyl, and others) interacts with CELERY

    Levothyroxine is used for low thyroid function. Taking celery seed along with levothyroxine might reduce the effects of levothyroxine.

  • Lithium interacts with CELERY

    Taking celery might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using celery if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be changed.

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with CELERY

    Celery root might slow blood clotting. Taking celery root along with medications that also slow blood clotting might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding.

  • Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) substrates) interacts with CELERY

    Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Celery might change how quickly the liver breaks down these medications. This could change the effects and side effects of these medications.

  • Venlafaxine (Effexor) interacts with CELERY

    Celery root extract might decrease how quickly the body breaks down venlafaxine. Taking celery root extract with venlafaxine might increase the effects and side effects of venlafaxine.

    Minor Interaction

    Be watchful with this combination

  • Medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight (Photosensitizing drugs) interacts with CELERY

    Some medications might make the skin more sensitive to sunlight. Celery might also make the skin more sensitive to sunlight. Using these products together might increase the risk of sunburn, blistering, or rashes when the skin is exposed to sunlight. Be sure to wear sunblock and protective clothing when spending time in the sun.

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol) interacts with CELERY

    Taking celery juice with acetaminophen prolongs the effects of acetaminophen. Taking celery juice with acetaminophen might increase the effects and side effects of acetaminophen.

  • Aminopyrine interacts with CELERY

    Celery juice might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down and removes aminopyrine. Taking celery juice with aminopyrine might increase the effects and side effects of aminopyrine.

Dosing

Celery stem, oil, and seeds are commonly consumed in foods.

As medicine, celery seed powder or extract have most often been used by adults in doses of 1000-1500 mg by mouth daily. Speak with a healthcare provider to find out what dose might be best for a specific condition.
View References

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2020.