Skip to content

Before You Buy a Bike continued...

You can also look in the classified ads or ask local retailers about used and reconditioned bikes. Talk to friends as well, says Calabrese. 

Can you convert your outdoor bike? If you already have an outdoor bike, says Calabrese, consider buying a cycle trainer or set of rollers. Trainers essentially let you convert an outdoor bike into a stationary one by elevating and mounting the back wheel and removing the front wheel. Rollers are for more experienced riders because you have to balance your back wheel on them to ride. Both are easy to store when not being used. 

Should you go recumbent? Recumbent bikes, which became popular about a decade ago, tend to be favored by seniors or those needing a rehabilitation tool. "They're comfortable and non-impact," says Calabrese.

But don't mistake that for easier, she warns. "When you're upright, you've got weight and gravity on your side. When you're lying back (recumbent), you have to do almost more work to turn the crank."

Whatever bike you choose; make sure you feel comfortable with it. Try it out in the store, with the shoes you'll be wearing. And ride for more than a few seconds to make sure it stays comfortable. You may even ask the retailer for a trial period to test the bike in your own environment.

Staying Motivated

The nice thing about having a stationary bike at home, says Magee, is the convenience and freedom. She loves to hop on her bike to watch the 30-minute sitcom Will & Grace. She tries to get through the entire show, commercials and all, before getting off.

"I've literally done (my workout) with my nightie on sometimes," says Magee.

Calabrese is not opposed to the idea of watching television or reading a magazine for distraction, though she concedes your workout may not be as intense. "The research on reading or watching television while cycling shows that the intensity tends to be lower," she says, "but people tend to work out longer."

Watching I Love Lucy reruns isn't the only way to motivate yourself, says Calabrese. She suggests:

  • Finding a partner -- a friend, spouse or significant other -- to exercise with. This will give you accountability and help you stick with a routine.
  • Journaling. Write down your workouts a month in advance, or at least a week ahead, says Calabrese. If you have to miss one, reschedule it immediately.
  • Having a purpose to every workout. "One day could be strength, another recovery, another speed," she says. "Use different programs if the bike has them." Or integrate 10 to 15 minutes on the bike with some strength training, she says. Use the bike as your warm-up and cool down on a strength-training day, and before you know it, you've gotten in 10 minutes on the bike on an off day.
  • A change of scenery. Though it might be 40 degrees and raining outside, you can be transported to the South of France with the click of a button. You can buy cycling videos that offer beginner to advanced rides with scenery and a variety of challenges you can see right in front of you, says Calabrese. Collage Video offers these videos through its catalog and Web site.

Healthy Recipe Finder

Browse our collection of healthy, delicious recipes, from WebMD and Eating Well magazine.

Top searches: Chicken, Chocolate, Salad, Desserts, Soup

Heart Rate Calculator

Ensure you're exercising hard enough to get a good workout, but not strain your heart.

While you are exercising, you should count between...

-
Beats
PER
Seconds