Understanding Thyroid Problems -- Symptoms

What Are the Symptoms of Thyroid Problems?

The symptoms of

The symptoms of hypothyroidism, in which the body doesn't produce enough thyroid hormones, may include:

  • Lethargy, slower mental processes or depression
  • Reduced heart rate
  • Increased sensitivity to cold
  • Tingling or numbness in the hands
  • Development of a goiter (an enlargement in your neck)
  • Constipation, heavy menstrual periods, or dry skin and hair

Subacute thyroiditis:

  • Mild to severe pain in the thyroid gland
  • The thyroid feels tender to the touch
  • Pain or discomfort when swallowing or turning your head
  • Appearance of these symptoms shortly after a viral infection, such as the flu, mumps, or measles

Call Your Doctor About Thyroid Problems If:

  • You have any of the symptoms listed above.

Call 911 or seek emergency medical care if:

  • You are feverish, agitated, or delirious, and have a rapid pulse; you could be having a thyrotoxic crisis, a sudden and dangerous complication of hyperthyroidism.
  • You feel intensely cold, drowsy and lethargic; you could be experiencing a myxedema coma, a sudden and dangerous complication of hypothyroidism that can cause unconsciousness and possibly death.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, DO, MS on March 23, 2015

Sources

SOURCES:
American Academy of Family Physicians.
The American Thyroid Association.
EndocrineWeb.com.
The Norman Endocrine Surgery Clinic.
Community Health Care Medicial Library.
Johns Hopkins University.
U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.
Mary Shoman, patient Advocate - About.com.
WebMD Drug Reference from MedicineNet: "Levothyroxine Oral."

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