Overview

Scotch broom is a plant. The flower and the parts that grow above the ground are used as medicine.

Despite serious safety concerns, Scotch broom is used for heart problems including fluid retention (edema), poor circulation, low blood pressure, fast heartbeat, and irregular heartbeat.

Some people use Scotch broom for bleeding gums, a bleeding disorder called hemophilia, gout, achy muscles and joints (rheumatism), sciatic nerve pain, gall stones, kidney stones, spleen disorders, yellowing of the skin (jaundice), lung conditions, and snake bites. It is also used for cleansing the intestine and to cause vomiting.

Women use Scotch broom for heavy menstrual periods and for bleeding after childbirth.

Scotch broom is applied to the skin for sore muscles, pockets of infection (abscesses), and swelling. It is also used in hair rinses to lighten and brighten hair.

How does it work ?

Scotch broom contains chemicals that might cause an increase in body water loss through the urine. It also contains chemicals that affect heart rhythm.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2020.