ACEROLA

OTHER NAME(S):

Acérola, Acerola Cherry, Antilles Cherry, Barbados Cherry, Barbadoskirsche, Cereja das Antilhas, Cereja do Para, Cerejeira das Antilhas, Cereso, Cereza, Cerise de Cayenne, Cerise de la Barbade, Cerise des Antilles, Cerise de la Barbade, Cerisier, Cerisier de Barbade, Cerisier des Antilles, Chereese, Grosella, Puerto Rican Cherry, Semeruco, West Indian Cherry, West Indies Cherry, Westindische Kirsche. Malpighia emarginata, Malpighia glabra, Malpighia punicifolia, Malpighia retusa. <br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Acerola is a shrub or small tree that is native to Central America, northern South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. The fruit is similar to a cherry and is a deep red color when ripe. It is a rich source of vitamin C.

Acerola is commonly used by mouth to prevent vitamin C deficiency, and to treat scurvy, a disease caused by vitamin C deficiency. It is also used for the common cold, diarrhea, liver problems, and other conditions. But there is limited scientific research to support these other uses.

How does it work?

The health benefits of acerola are likely due to its vitamin C content.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Possibly Effective for

  • As a source of vitamin C to prevent deficiency.

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Cancer prevention.
  • Depression.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Liver disorders.
  • Preventing heart disease.
  • Tooth decay.
  • Treating the common cold.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of acerola for these conditions.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Acerola is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth in doses under 2000 mg of vitamin C per day. Doses that provide more than 2000 mg of vitamin C increase the risk of side effects such as severe diarrhea.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of acerola during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Blood-iron disorders, including conditions called "thalassemia" and "hemochromatosis": Vitamin C can increase iron absorption, which might make these conditions worse. Avoid large amounts of acerola due to its vitamin C content.

Kidney stones (nephrolithiasis): In large doses, acerola might increase the chance of getting kidney stones. That's because of the vitamin C in acerola.

Latex allergy: People with latex allergy might also react to acerola.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Fluphenazine (Prolixin) interacts with ACEROLA

    Acerola contains vitamin C. Large amounts of vitamin C might decrease how much fluphenazine (Prolixin) is in the body. This might decrease how well fluphenazine works.

  • Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with ACEROLA

    Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. Acerola contains vitamin C. Large amounts of vitamin C might decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). Decreasing the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin) might increase the risk of clotting. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.

Minor Interaction

Be watchful with this combination

!
  • Estrogens interacts with ACEROLA

    Acerola contains a large amount of vitamin C. Vitamin C can increase how much estrogen the body absorbs. Increasing the absorption of estrogen can increase the effects and side effects of estrogens.<br/><br/> Some estrogen pills include conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin), ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, and others.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of acerola depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for acerola. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

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  • Lynch SR. Interaction of iron with other nutrients. Nutr Rev 1997;55:102-10.. View abstract.
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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.