INDIAN GOOSEBERRY

OTHER NAME(S):

Aamalaki, Amalaki, Amblabaum, Amla, Amla Berry, Aonla, Aovla, Arbre de Malacca, Arbre Myrobolan, Dhatriphala, Emblic, Emblica, Emblica officinalis, Emblic Myrobalan, Groseille à Maquereau Indienne, Groseille Indienne, Groseillier de Ceylan, Grosella de la India, Indian-Gooseberry, Mirobalano, Myrobalan Emblic, Mirobalanus embilica, Neli, Phyllanthus emblica, Yu Gan Zi.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Indian gooseberry is a tree that grows in India, the Middle East, and some southeast Asian countries. Indian gooseberry has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years. Today people still use the fruit of the tree to make medicine.

Indian gooseberry is taken by mouth for high cholesterol, "hardening of the arteries" (atherosclerosis), diabetes, pain and swelling of the pancreas (pancreatitis), cancer, upset stomach, eye problems, joint pain, diarrhea, bloody diarrhea (dysentery), osteoarthritis, obesity, "organ restoration", and for a skin disorder that causes unpigmented skin (vitiligo). It is also used to kill germs and reduce pain and swelling caused by the body's reaction to injury or illness (inflammation).

How does it work?

Indian gooseberry seems to work by reducing total cholesterol levels, including the fatty acids called triglycerides, without affecting levels of the "good cholesterol" called high-density lipoprotein (HDL).

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • High cholesterol. Some early research shows that taking Indian gooseberry for 4 weeks decreases low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol in people with high cholesterol. Other early research shows that taking Indian gooseberry extract for 12 weeks decreases LDL cholesterol in obese people.
  • Osteoarthritis. Research shows that taking two capsules of an Ayurvedic formula containing Indian gooseberry and several other ingredients three times daily for 24 weeks is as beneficial as taking glucosamine sulfate or the drug celecoxib for reducing pain in people with knee osteoarthritis.
  • Skin disorder that causes unpigmented skin (vitiligo). Early research suggests that taking one tablet containing Indian gooseberry and other ingredients three times daily for 6 months along with standard treatment can increase skin repigmentation and reduce signs of inflammation better than standard treatment alone.
  • Bloody diarrhea (dysentery).
  • Cancer.
  • Diabetes.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Eye problems.
  • Hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis).
  • Indigestion.
  • Joint pain.
  • Obesity.
  • Swelling of the pancreas.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate Indian gooseberry for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Indian gooseberry seems LIKELY SAFE for most people when consumed in amounts found in foods. Ayurvedic formulations containing Indian gooseberry have been linked to liver damage. But, it's not clear if taking Indian gooseberry alone might have these effects.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking Indian gooseberry as medicine if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and stick to food amounts.

Bleeding disorders: Indian gooseberry might increase the risk of bleeding or bruising in some people. If you have a bleeding disorder, use Indian gooseberry with caution.

Diabetes: Indian gooseberry might decrease blood sugar levels. Your diabetes medications might need to be adjusted by your healthcare provider.

Liver disease: In theory, taking Indian gooseberry with ginger, Tinospora cordifolia, and Indian frankincense might make liver function worse in people with liver disease. But it's not known if taking Indian gooseberry alone can have these effects.

Surgery: Indian gooseberry might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking Indian gooseberry at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for INDIAN GOOSEBERRY Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of Indian gooseberry depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for Indian gooseberry. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

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More Resources for INDIAN GOOSEBERRY

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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