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Swiss Cheese: Are There Health Benefits?

Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on October 16, 2020

Nutritional Info

Serving Size 1 Slice
Calories 106
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 8 g
12%
Saturated Fat 5 g
25%
Trans Fat 0 g
Cholesterol 26 mg
9%
Sodium 54 mg
2%
Potassium 0 mg
0%
Total Carbohydrate 2 g
1%
Dietary Fiber 0 g
0%
Sugar 0 g
Protein 8 g
16%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin C 0%
  • Iron 0%
  • Vitamin B6 0%
  • Magnesium 0%
  • Calcium 22%
  • Vitamin D 0%
  • Cobalamin 0%
  • Vitamin A 5%

Any type of cheese has certain benefits, like high levels of calcium and protein, which contribute to a healthy diet. Swiss cheese, a medium-hard cheese, made from cow’s milk, is an excellent source of daily required nutrients. This type of cheese is known for its large holes, which are formed by carbon dioxide accumulation in the body of the cheese during the maturation process. Large holes indicate a stronger flavor and longer maturation process.

Here’s what you need to know about swiss cheese, including its main health benefits and risks.

Nutrition Information

A fourth of a cup of shredded swiss cheese contains the following:

  • Calories: 103
  • Calories from fat: 68
  • Total fat: 8g
  • Saturated fat: 5g
  • Cholesterol: 25mg
  • Sodium: 52mg
  • Total carbohydrates: 1g
  • Protein: 7g

Swiss cheese can help contribute to a balanced diet, as long as it’s eaten in moderation. Some of the nutrients found in swiss cheese are:

L-TryptophanNutrition Information

Potential Health Benefits of Swiss Cheese

Eating swiss cheese could provide a few important health benefits; however, it may also present risks for people with certain health conditions.

Bone Health

Both the protein and calcium found in swiss cheese contribute to healthier, stronger bones. Protein has been linked to the development of bones and their formation. In addition, calcium intake ensures that our bones are healthy, and also contributes to healthy blood flow and muscles.

Builds Muscle Mass

Swiss cheese contains a lot of protein. While protein is a necessity for our diets, it also provides benefits to the body like building muscle mass and contributing to our strength. Eating more protein has been proven to be directly related to building strength in resistance training.

Lower Blood Pressure

More research is needed to fully connect swiss cheese with lower blood pressure. However, one study showed that cheese contains concentrations of two antihypertensive peptides (protein components found in milk, eggs, and meat) that were found to have blood pressure-lowering properties.

Boosts Metabolism

Lots of protein is also beneficial to boosting your metabolism and reducing food cravings, which help you avoid overeating and gaining weight.

Foods that contain high protein, like swiss cheese, have been shown to lower the number of calories you burn and give you more energy, especially when compared to diets high in carbohydrates.

Potential Risks of Swiss Cheese

There are a few additional considerations you should be aware of when eating swiss cheese. While the risks are fairly low if consumed in moderation, swiss cheese does contain fat, salt, and lactose, all of which could be detrimental to some people.

High Blood Pressure and Heart Disease

Because swiss cheese contains higher levels of both sodium and fat, eating it could lead to a greater risk of developing high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Lactose Intolerance

Additionally, a person who is lactose intolerant should avoid eating swiss cheese. Because cheese contains lactose like other milk and dairy products, those with a lactose intolerance could experience diarrhea, belly pain, or excessive bloating after consuming it.

Healthier Alternatives

There are several foods you can eat to replace cheese intake if you’re lactose intolerant or want to avoid salt and fat. There are vegan cheese recipes that take dairy out of the equation, and instead use ingredients like potatoes, carrots, water, yeast, and oil, among others, to recreate the taste and texture of cheese.

Additionally, most grocery stores sell low- or reduced-fat cheeses of all types, which will also contain less fat and fewer calories, helping you balance your diet.

Show Sources

SOURCES:

Circulation: “Sodium, Blood Pressure, and Cardiovascular Disease.”

Circulation: “Swiss Cheese—Like Atrial Septal Defect.”

ESHA Research, Inc., Salem, Oregon: “Swiss Cheese.”

John Hopkins Medicine: “Lactose Intolerance.”

Journal of the American College of Nutrition: “Dietary protein: an essential nutrient for bone health.”

National Osteoporosis Foundation: “Calcium and Vitamin D.”

Journal of the American College of Nutrition: “Postprandial thermogenesis is increased 100% on a high-protein, low-fat diet versus a high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet in healthy, young women.”

Journal of the American College of Nutrition: “Types of Dietary Fat and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: A Critical Review.”

Journal of Dairy Science: “Occurrence of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibiting tripeptides Val-Pro-Pro and Ile-Pro-Pro in different cheese varieties of Swiss origin.”

Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition: “Dietary protein to maximize resistance training: a review and examination of protein spread and change theories.”

Medical News Today: “Is cheese good or bad for you?”

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