How to use Prednisolone

Take this medication by mouth, with food or milk to prevent stomach upset, exactly as directed by your doctor. Carefully measure the dose using a special measuring device/spoon. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose.

There are many brands, strengths, and forms of liquid prednisolone available. Read the dosing instructions carefully for each product because the amount of prednisolone may be different between products. See also Precautions and Storage sections.

Follow the dosing schedule carefully. The dosage and length of treatment are based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Your doctor may direct you to take prednisolone 1 to 4 times a day or take a single dose every other day. It may help to mark your calendar with reminders.

Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Some conditions may become worse when this drug is suddenly stopped. Your dose may need to be gradually decreased.

If you suddenly stop using this medication, you may have withdrawal symptoms (such as weakness, weight loss, nausea, muscle pain, headache, tiredness, dizziness). To help prevent withdrawal, your doctor may lower your dose slowly. Withdrawal is more likely if you have used prednisolone for a long time or in high doses. Tell your doctor or pharmacist right away if you have withdrawal. See also Precautions section.

Tell your doctor if your condition lasts or gets worse.

Side Effects

Nausea, heartburn, headache, dizziness, menstrual period changes, trouble sleeping, increased sweating, or acne may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that this medication has been prescribed because your doctor has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Because this drug works by weakening the immune system, it may lower your ability to fight infections. This may make you more likely to get a serious (rarely fatal) infection or make any infection you have worse. Tell your doctor right away if you have any signs of infection (such as cough, sore throat, fever, chills). Use of this medication for prolonged or repeated periods may result in oral thrush or a yeast infection. Contact your doctor if you notice white patches in your mouth or a change in vaginal discharge.

This medication may rarely make your blood sugar rise, which can cause or worsen diabetes. Tell your doctor right away if you have symptoms of high blood sugar such as increased thirst/urination. If you already have diabetes, check your blood sugar regularly as directed and share the results with your doctor. Your doctor may need to adjust your diabetes medication, exercise program, or diet.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: unusual tiredness, swelling ankles/feet, unusual weight gain, vision problems, easy bruising/bleeding, puffy face, unusual hair growth, mental/mood changes (such as depression, mood swings, agitation), muscle weakness/pain, thinning skin, slow wound healing, bone pain, symptoms of stomach/intestinal bleeding (such as stomach/abdominal pain, black/tarry stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds).

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: chest pain, seizures.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Before taking prednisolone, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to prednisone; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: eye disease (such as cataracts, glaucoma), heart problems (such as heart failure, recent heart attack), high blood pressure, liver disease, kidney disease, thyroid problems, diabetes, stomach/intestinal problems (such as diverticulitis, ulcer), brittle bones (osteoporosis), current/past infections (such as tuberculosis, positive tuberculosis test, herpes, fungal), bleeding problems, blood clots, certain mental/mood conditions (such as psychosis, anxiety, depression), low salts in the blood (such as low potassium or calcium), seizures.

This drug may make you dizzy. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness until you can do it safely. Limit alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis).

This medicine may cause stomach bleeding. Daily use of alcohol while using this medicine may increase your risk for stomach bleeding. Limit alcoholic beverages. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

This product may contain alcohol, sugar, and/or aspartame. Caution is advised if you have diabetes, alcohol dependence, liver disease, phenylketonuria (PKU), or any other condition that requires you to limit/avoid these substances in your diet. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about using this product safely.

Using corticosteroid medications for a long time can make it more difficult for your body to respond to physical stress. Before having surgery or emergency treatment, or if you get a serious illness/injury, tell your doctor or dentist that you are using this medication or have used this medication within the past 12 months. Tell your doctor right away if you develop unusual/extreme tiredness or weight loss. If you will be using this medication for a long time, carry a warning card or medical ID bracelet that identifies your use of this medication.

This medication may mask signs of infection. It can make you more likely to get infections or may make current infections worse. Stay away from anyone who has an infection that may easily spread (such as chickenpox, COVID-19, measles, flu). Talk to your doctor if you have been exposed to an infection or for more details.

Tell your health care professional that you are using prednisolone before having any immunizations/vaccinations. Avoid contact with people who have recently received live vaccines (such as flu vaccine inhaled through the nose).

This medication may slow down a child's growth if used for a long time. Consult the doctor or pharmacist for more details. See the doctor regularly so your child's height and growth can be checked.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this drug, especially bone loss/pain, stomach/intestinal bleeding, and mental/mood changes (such as confusion).

During pregnancy, prednisolone should be used only when clearly needed. It may rarely harm an unborn baby. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Infants born to mothers who have been using this medication for an extended period of time may have hormone problems. Tell your doctor right away if you notice symptoms such as nausea/vomiting that doesn't stop, severe diarrhea, or weakness in your newborn.

This medication passes into breast milk. However, this drug is unlikely to harm a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: aldesleukin, desmopressin, other drugs that weaken the immune system (such as azathioprine, cyclosporine, cancer chemotherapy), mifepristone, drugs that can cause bleeding/bruising (including antiplatelet drugs such as clopidogrel, "blood thinners" such as dabigatran/warfarin, NSAIDs such as aspirin/celecoxib/ibuprofen).

Other medications can affect the removal of prednisolone from your body, which may affect how prednisolone works. Examples include estrogens, azole antifungals (such as itraconazole), St. John's wort, drugs used to treat seizures (such as phenytoin), among others.

If your doctor has told you to take low-dose aspirin to prevent heart attack or stroke (usually 81-162 milligrams a day), you should keep taking the aspirin unless your doctor tells you not to. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

This medication may interfere with certain lab tests (such as skin tests), possibly causing false test results. Make sure lab personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

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Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call 1-844-764-7669.

Notes Notes

Do not share this medication with others.

If this medication is used for a long time, lab and/or medical tests (such as blood sugar/mineral levels, blood counts, blood pressure, bone density tests, eye exams, height/weight measurements, X-rays) should be done while you are taking this medication. Keep all medical and lab appointments. Consult your doctor for more details.

This medication may cause bone problems (osteoporosis). Lifestyle changes that may help reduce the risk of bone problems while taking this drug for an extended time include doing weight-bearing exercise, getting enough calcium and vitamin D, stopping smoking, and limiting alcohol. Discuss with your doctor lifestyle changes that might benefit you.

Missed Dose Missed Dose

If you are taking this medication once daily and miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose. Take your next dose at the regular time. If you are taking this medication every other day, ask your doctor or pharmacist what you should do if you miss a dose.

Storage Storage

Store this medication according to the directions on the product package away from light and moisture. Some brands must be refrigerated, and others must be stored at room temperature. Consult your pharmacist for more details. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

Images

prednisolone 15 mg/5 mL oral solution

prednisolone 15 mg/5 mL oral solution

Color: pinkish-redShape: Imprint:

This medicine is a pinkish-red, clear, wild cherry, solution

prednisolone 15 mg/5 mL oral solution

prednisolone 15 mg/5 mL oral solution

Color: redShape: Imprint:

This medicine is a pinkish-red, clear, wild cherry, solution

prednisolone 15 mg/5 mL oral solution

prednisolone 15 mg/5 mL oral solution

Color: redShape: Imprint:

This medicine is a pinkish-red, clear, wild cherry, solution

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CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.