Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Children's Health

Font Size

Blood Sugar Monitoring System OK'd for Children

However, device didn't perform as well in kids as in adults, FDA says

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Scott Roberts

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Feb. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of the Dexcom G4 Platinum Continuous Monitoring System has been expanded to include children with diabetes aged 2 years to 17 years, the agency said.

Previously approved for adults only, the device constantly monitors the user's blood sugar, checking for dangerously high or low levels, the FDA said in a news release. An estimated 25.8 million people in the United States -- including 215,000 under age 20 -- have diabetes.

The external device, known as a continuous glucose monitor, includes a small, narrow sensor that's inserted just under the skin. That combined with a blood glucose meter can help the user's doctor decide treatment options, such as the amount of insulin to prescribe, the FDA said.

The device was evaluated in clinical studies involving 176 people ages 2 to 17. The FDA warned the device's "performance in pediatric subjects was not as accurate as the performance of the same device in adults." Nonetheless, the agency said the device is still "effective for tracking and trending to determine patterns in glucose levels," and for warning users that their blood sugar had risen too high or fallen too low.

The system is produced by Dexcom Inc., based in San Diego.

Today on WebMD

child with red rash on cheeks
What’s that rash?
plate of fruit and veggies
How healthy is your child’s diet?
smiling baby
Treating diarrhea, fever and more.
Middle school band practice
Understanding your child’s changing body.

worried kid
jennifer aniston
Measles virus
sick child

Child with adhd
rl with friends
Syringes and graph illustration