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Diabetes Health Center

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Optimum Blood Sugar Level for Kids With Type 1

Targeted levels are made lower, but young patients need individualized care, ADA guideline says

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, June 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Experts at the American Diabetes Association are advising a lower blood sugar target for children and teens with type 1 diabetes.

According to the ADA, patients younger than age 19 should try to maintain an A1C blood sugar level lower than 7.5 percent, the group said in a new position statement.

A1C is a test that determines average blood sugar (glucose) levels over several months.

"The new targets should help redouble efforts at improving glucose control in the patient group that is currently most challenging -- adolescents," said Dr. Robert Rapaport, director of the division of pediatric endocrinology and diabetes at Kravis Children's Hospital at Mount Sinai, New York City. He was not involved in drawing up the new guidelines.

In type 1 diabetes, the body can't produce enough insulin to convert food into energy, and people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin to survive.

Previously recommended A1C levels could be as high as 8.5 percent for children younger than 6 years, 8 percent for those ages 6 to 12, and 7.5 percent for those ages 13 to 19. These higher targets were set due to concerns about complications caused by a sometimes dangerous condition known as low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia.

However, recent research shows that prolonged highblood sugar levels -- hyperglycemia -- can lead to the development of serious complications in children, including heart and kidney disease. Previously, it had been thought that these complications occurred only in adults.

The targets for blood sugar control have therefore been ratcheted a bit downwards, the ADA explained.

The new blood sugar target for youngsters with type 1 diabetes, which was released at the ADA's annual meeting in San Francisco on Monday, matches the guidelines of the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes.

"The evidence shows that there is a greater risk of harm from prolonged hyperglycemia that would occur if children maintained an A1C of 8.5 percent over time," statement co-lead author Dr. Jane Chiang, the ADA's senior vice president for medical and community affairs, said in an association news release.

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