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What are the complications of diabetic retinopathy?

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If diabetic retinopathy causes fluid buildup and swelling in a part of your retina called the macula, you can get dDiabetic macular edema (DME) , or swelling in part of your retina called the macula, is a serious complication of diabetic retinopathy. A healthy macula gives you sharp vision straight in front of you. This is what you need to drive, read, or see other people's faces. If your diabetic retinopathy causes fluid build-up and swelling in your macula, you can get DME.

DME is the most common reason people with diabetic retinopathy lose their vision, and about About 50%half of people with diabetic retinopathy get DME. You're more likely to get DME it at later stages of diabetic retinopathy, but it can happen at any point.

Sometimes, vision loss from DME can't be reversed.

SOURCES:

National Eye Institute: “Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease,” “How is macular edema treated?”

Cleveland Clinic: “Diabetic Retinopathy.”

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Diabetic Retinopathy?”

National Eye Institute: Mayo Clinic: “Diabetic retinopathy.”

CDC: “Common Eye Disorders.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on June 22, 2021

SOURCES:

National Eye Institute: “Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease,” “How is macular edema treated?”

Cleveland Clinic: “Diabetic Retinopathy.”

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Diabetic Retinopathy?”

National Eye Institute: Mayo Clinic: “Diabetic retinopathy.”

CDC: “Common Eye Disorders.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on June 22, 2021

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Can you prevent diabetic retinopathy?

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