Warnings:

Arsenic trioxide is a strong medication that can cause serious, rarely fatal side effects. To decrease your risk, your doctor will monitor you closely during treatment.

Infrequently, this medication may cause a serious condition called APL differentiation syndrome. Tell your doctor right away if the following effects occur: unusual/unexplained fever, shortness of breath/difficulty breathing, and/or weight gain. Your doctor may direct you to weigh yourself regularly and report any sudden weight gain. Your doctor may also perform certain exams or tests (e.g., lung exam, X-rays) to determine if this syndrome has developed.

Infrequently, this medication can also cause serious (rarely fatal) heart problems (e.g., AV block, torsades de pointes-type arrhythmias). Tell your doctor if you have any medical history of heart problems (e.g., fast/irregular heartbeat, heart failure), kidney problems, low levels of minerals in your blood (e.g., calcium, potassium, magnesium). Also tell your doctor if you take any medications that increase your risk for these heart problems or low levels of minerals (see also Drug Interactions section). To decrease your risk, your doctor may order a heart rhythm test (EKG) or blood tests before and during treatment.

Get medical help right away if you develop severe dizziness, fainting, or fast/irregular heartbeat.

This medication may increase your risk of getting a rare but very serious (possibly fatal) brain disorder. This risk may be higher if you have low levels of thiamine (vitamin B1), alcohol use disorder, or difficulty absorbing nutrition from food (malabsorption syndrome). Get medical help right away if you have any of these side effects: clumsiness, loss of coordination/balance, weakness, sudden change in your thinking (such as confusion, difficulty concentrating, memory loss), difficulty talking/walking, seizures, vision changes.

Uses

Arsenic trioxide is used to treat a type of leukemia (acute promyelocytic leukemia-APL).

How to use Arsenic Trioxide Vial

This medication is given by injection into a vein by a health care professional over 2 hours, usually once daily or as directed by your doctor. The injection may be injected more slowly (e.g., over 4 hours) if you have a reaction to the medication such as dizziness, flushing, or fast heartbeat.

The dosage, treatment schedule, and length of treatment are based on your weight, medical condition, and response to treatment. Your doctor will order tests (e.g., EKG, blood minerals) to find the right dose for you. Your next dose may need to be rescheduled if your heartbeat or blood tests are abnormal.

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CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.