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Common Pregnancy Pains and Their Causes

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Pregnancy Nausea or Vomiting

It's very common -- and normal -- to have an upset stomach when you're pregnant. 

Chalk it up to  pregnancy's hormonal changes. It usually happens early in pregnancy, while your body is adjusting to the higher hormone levels.

Good news: Nausea usually disappears by the fourth month of pregnancy. It can happen at any time of the day but may be worse in the morning, when your stomach is empty (that why it's called "morning sickness") or if you aren't eating enough.

Recommendations:

  • If nausea is a problem in the morning, eat dry foods like cereal, toast or crackers before getting out of bed. Try eating a high-protein snack such as lean meat or cheese before going to bed (protein takes longer to digest).
  • If you are hungry but extremely nauseated, try the BRAT (bananas, rice and tea) diet.
  • Seabands offer some pregnant women comfort.
  • Ginger may combat nausea.
  • Eat small meals or snacks every two to three hours rather than three large meals. Eat slowly and chew your food completely.
  • Sip on fluids throughout the day. Avoid large amounts of fluids at one time. Try cool, clear fruit juices, such as apple or grape juice.
  • Avoid spicy, fried, or greasy foods.
  • If you are bothered by strong smells, eat foods cold or at room temperature to minimize or avoid odors that bother you.
  • Talk to your doctor about taking vitamin B6. Other  natural treatments and prescription medications can provide relief.
  • Contact your health care provider if your vomiting is constant or so severe that you can't keep fluids or foods down. This can cause dehydration and should be treated right away.

Pregnancy Frequent Urination

Your growing uterus and baby press against your bladder, causing a frequent need to urinate during the first trimester. This will happen again in the third trimester, when the baby's head drops into the pelvis before birth.

Recommendations:

  • Don't wear tight-fitting underwear, pants, or pantyhose.
  • If your urine burns or stings, it could be a sign of urinary tract infection. Contact your health care provider right away to treat it.
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