Skip to content

Multiple Sclerosis Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Multiple Sclerosis

  1. Multiple Sclerosis (MS) - When To Call a Doctor

    Some of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) are similar to those of many other illnesses. See your doctor if over a period of time you have more than one symptom, such as: Blurry, foggy, or hazy vision, eyeball pain, loss of vision, or double vision.

  2. Neurological Examination for Multiple Sclerosis

    Before conducting a neurological examination for multiple sclerosis (MS), the doctor will collect information about your symptoms. The kinds of symptoms, as well as how and when they occur, are important in evaluating whether you might have MS. Even symptoms that you might have had several years ago can be important.The neurological examination will cover:Mental ability and emotional ...

  3. Multiple Sclerosis: Mental and Emotional Problems - Topic Overview

    Cognitive impairment problems can be caused by multiple sclerosis (MS) and may include difficulty with: Memory,especially short-term memory. Problem solving. Keeping attention on a mental task,such as a math calculation. Finding the right words to express yourself. These problems are often quite mild early in the course of the disease. But they may get worse with time,depending on the ...

  4. Multiple Sclerosis: Bladder Problems - Topic Overview

    A person with multiple sclerosis (MS) may have difficulty emptying the bladder completely, because the muscle that helps to retain urine cannot relax (a form of spasticity).Sometimes urination can be stimulated by pressing or tapping the bladder area or by straining. Medicines can also help in some cases, including propantheline, oxybutynin (for example, Ditropan), or tolterodine (Detrol).When these methods or medicines do not help, you may have to use a urinary catheter, a thin flexible tube that you can insert into the channel through which urine exits the body (urethra). This is called intermittent self-catheterization. A little instruction and a few practice sessions with a nurse are all that are needed to learn to do intermittent self-catheterization. The procedure is usually done at the toilet.The technique provides immediate relief of symptoms and helps prevent urinary tract infections and their complications.Some people who have MS may only need to use the technique for a few

  5. Multiple Sclerosis: Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) - Topic Overview

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is a medicine often used to boost the body's immune system and make it better able to fight disease. It is made from donated blood fluids. Treatment with IVIG may improve function and lengthen the time before a relapse in people who have relapsing-remitting MS. 1 It does not seem to help slow the progression of MS. 2 IVIG can also lengthen the time before a ...

  6. Multiple Sclerosis: Rehabilitation Programs

    When you have multiple sclerosis (MS), you may have certain physical and cognitive challenges. Rehabilitation-including physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and cognitive retraining-may help reduce these disabilities.Key pointsPhysical therapy may improve your ability to perform daily activities and make you feel better.Occupational therapy may help you perform daily activities

  7. Multiple Sclerosis Progression - Topic Overview

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects different people in different ways. For people who have only mild symptoms from time to time,the disease may not have much impact on their everyday lives. People with more severe MS have frequently recurring or ongoing symptoms and may become disabled within a few years. Most people with MS are between these extremes. For them,MS involves a series of attacks ...

  8. Multiple Sclerosis: Medicines for Muscle Stiffness and Tremors - Topic Overview

    Spasticity Several medicines may be used to treat muscle stiffness ( spasticity ) caused by multiple sclerosis (MS). Baclofen (Lioresal) is the drug of choice for spasticity. It is available in tablets or by delivery through a pump implanted in the lower spinal area. Pump delivery is effective for those with severe spasticity. Tizanidine (Zanaflex) is a drug similar to baclofen. It is ...

  9. Primary Progressive MS and Gender

    Unlike other forms of multiple sclerosis, primary progressive MS strikes women and men equally. WebMD explains the numbers and reviews the theories about why that is.

  10. Multiple Sclerosis: Now What?

    WebMD provides essential questions to ask your doctor after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

Displaying 81 - 90 of 121 Articles << Prev Page 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Next >>

Today on WebMD

nerve damage
Learn how this disease affects the nervous system.
woman applying lotion
Ideas on how to boost your mood and self-esteem.
 
woman pondering
Get personalized treatment options.
man with hand over eye
Be on the lookout for these symptoms.
 
brain scan
ARTICLE
worried woman
ARTICLE
 
neural fiber
ARTICLE
white blood cells
VIDEO
 
sunlight in hands
ARTICLE
illustration of human spine
ARTICLE
 
muscle spasm
ARTICLE
green eyed woman with glasses
ARTICLE