Skip to content

Diabetes Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Diabetes

  1. Non-Diabetes Medicines That May Lower Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

    Some medicines for other conditions can lower your blood sugar level or can interfere with whether you develop symptoms of low blood sugar. This is a concern when you have diabetes. Talk with your doctor before taking any new medicine. Medicines that can lower your blood sugar level include: Medicines to reduce fever and relieve pain,such as salicylate medicines like aspirin. Medicines to ...

  2. Meglitinides for Type 2 Diabetes

    Drug details for Meglitinides for type 2 diabetes.

  3. Diabetic Neuropathy - Health Tools

    Use these diabetic neuropathy health tools to help make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.

  4. Diabetic Neuropathy - Treatment Overview

    There is currently no cure for diabetic neuropathy. Once it has developed, treatment focuses on preventing the condition from worsening by consistently keeping your blood sugar levels tightly controlled within a narrow target range.

  5. Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It? - Topic Overview

    Can you reverse type 2 diabetes? Can you cure it? Diabetes can go into remission. When diabetes is in remission, you have no signs or symptoms of it. But your risk of relapse is higher than normal.1 That's why you make the same daily healthy choices that you do for active type 2 diabetes.Is there a cure for diabetes?There is no known cure for type 2 diabetes. But it can be controlled. And in some cases, it goes into remission. Keys to control For some people, a diabetes-healthy lifestyle is enough to control their blood sugar levels. That means losing weight if you are overweight, eating healthy foods, and being more active. But most people with type 2 diabetes also need to take one or more medicines or insulin. What is remission? Of those people who don't need diabetes medicine, some find that their diabetes does reverse with weight control, diabetes-healthy eating, and exercise. Their bodies are still able to make and use insulin, and their blood sugar levels go back to normal.

  6. Criteria for Diagnosing Diabetes - Topic Overview

    To be diagnosed with diabetes, you must meet one of the following criteria:1Have symptoms of diabetes (increased thirst, increased urination, and unexplained weight loss) and a blood sugar level equal to or greater than 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). The blood sugar test is done at any time, without regard for when you last ate (random plasma glucose test or random blood sugar test).Have a fasting blood sugar level that is equal to or greater than 126 mg/dL. A fasting blood sugar test (fasting plasma glucose) is done after not eating or drinking anything but water for 8 hours.Have a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) result that is equal to or greater than 200 mg/dL. An OGTT is most commonly done to check for diabetes that occurs with pregnancy (gestational diabetes). Have a hemoglobin A1c that is 6.5% or higher.The diagnosis of diabetes needs to be confirmed by repeating the same blood sugar test or doing a different test on another day. If the results of your fasting

  7. Insulin: Reusing Syringes and Lancets Safely - Topic Overview

    Some people with diabetes use their insulin syringes more than once to save money. Talk with your doctor before reusing your syringes. Some people who have diabetes should not reuse their syringes, including people who have:Trouble seeing clearly.Trouble using their hands.Infections or open wounds.Some precautions to take if you reuse syringes:Put the cover back on the needle after use. The safest way to do this is to place the cover and syringe on a flat surface and slide the cover over the needle without letting the needle touch either the flat surface or your fingers. Only the inside of the cover should touch the needle. Do not hold the syringe straight up; you may accidentally stick yourself.Do not clean the needle with alcohol. Alcohol removes the silicone covering on the needle, causing it to become dull.Store the syringes at room temperature. It is best to store them with the covered needle pointing up to prevent insulin from blocking the needle opening.Dispose of reused

  8. Diabetes and Alcohol - Topic Overview

    How does alcohol affect diabetes? When you have diabetes,you need to be careful with alcohol. If you take insulin or pills for diabetes,drinking alcohol may cause low blood sugar. Too much alcohol can also affect your ability to know when your blood sugar is low and to treat it. Drinking alcohol can make you feel lightheaded at first and drowsy as you drink more,both of which may be ...

  9. Non-Diabetes Medicines That May Raise Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

    Medicines that can raise blood sugar in a person who has diabetes include:Barbiturates.Thiazide diuretics.Corticosteroids.Birth control pills (oral contraceptives) and progesterone.Catecholamines.Decongestants that contain beta-adrenergic agents, such as pseudoephedrine.The B vitamin niacin. The risk of high blood sugar from niacin lowers after you have taken it for a few months.The antipsychotic medicine olanzapine (Zyprexa).

  10. Vascular Access Failure - Topic Overview

    Dialysis is a lifesaving treatment when you have kidney failure. To keep up a regular dialysis schedule, you need a sturdy dialysis access where blood can flow in and out of the body. It must have a good, steady blood flow.Any type of dialysis access has some risk of failure. So it's important to always protect your access and be alert for signs of clotting or infection. Call your doctor right away about any signs of trouble. Make a habit of talking with your dialysis nurses and doctor about how well your access is doing.If your dialysis access fails, it will be repaired or replaced. You and your doctor will choose your next best option for dialysis access. What are the options for hemodialysis access?Permanent accessThere are two permanent access types:An arteriovenous (AV) graft is made by inserting a small tube between an artery and a vein, usually in the upper arm or forearm. A graft is a good choice if you have small veins or other problems. It can sometimes be used as soon as 1

Displaying 201 - 210 of 494 Articles << Prev Page 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Next >>

Today on WebMD

Diabetic tools
Symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and more.
woman flexing muscles
10 strength training exercises.
Blood sugar test
12 practical tips.
Tom Hanks
Stars living with type 1 or type 2.
kenneth fujioka, md
Can Vinegar Treat Diabetes
Middle aged person
Home Healthcare

Prediabetes How to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
type 2 diabetes
food fitness planner