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Diabetes Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Diabetes

  1. Cinnamon and Diabetes

    WebMD looks at the possible benefits of cinnamon in managing diabetes.

  2. Types of Diabetes Mellitus

    WebMD explains the different types of diabetes -- type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes.

  3. 8 Lifestyle Tips to Avoid Diabetes Complications

    Making lifestyle changes will help you avoid the serious complications of diabetes. WebMD provides 8 tips to get you on track.

  4. Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is a kidney-related condition that causes excessive thirst and urination. WebMD explains its causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.

  5. What Is Diabetes Insipidus?

    Diabetes insipidus produces symptoms similar to garden-variety diabetes, but it is far less serious. WebMD explains the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of this disorder.

  6. Weight Loss Surgery and Type 2 Diabetes

    WebMD explains how weight loss surgery -- gastric bypass and gastric banding -- can help people manage type 2 diabetes.

  7. How the Blood Sugar of Diabetes Affects the Body

    Why are high blood sugar levels bad? WebMD examines the role of sugar in the development of diabetes and related conditions.

  8. Helping a Loved One Cope With Diabetes

    Caregiving for a person with diabetes can be challenging. WebMD looks at ways caregivers can help a person with diabetes manage the illness and find emotional support.

  9. Recipes and Cooking Tips for Those With Diabetes

    It's easy to modify your favorite recipes into diabetes-friendly dishes. WebMD tells you how to plan meals that are tasty and low in fats, sugars, and not-so-good carbs.

  10. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors

    Find out more from WebMD about the risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

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Is This Normal? Get the Facts Fast!

Check Your Blood Sugar Level Now
What type of diabetes do you have?
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Answer:
Low
0-69
Normal
70-130
High
131+

Your level is currently

If the level is below 70 and you are experiencing symptoms such as shaking, sweating or difficulty thinking, you will need to raise the number immediately. A quick solution is to eat a few pieces of hard candy or 1 tablespoon of sugar or honey. Recheck your numbers again in 15 minutes to see if the number has gone up. If not, repeat the steps above or call your doctor.

People who experience hypoglycemia several times in a week should call their health care provider. It's important to monitor your levels each day so you can make sure your numbers are within the range. If you are pregnant always consult with your health care provider.

Congratulations on taking steps to manage your health.

However, it's important to continue to track your numbers so that you can make lifestyle changes if needed. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

Your level is high if this reading was taken before eating. Aim for 70-130 before meals and less than 180 two hours after meals.

Even if your number is high, it's not too late for you to take control of your health and lower your blood sugar.

One of the first steps is to monitor your levels each day. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

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